The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950

By Samuel L. Leiter | Go to book overview

Appendix 10 Theatres
This is an alphabetical listing of the theatres engaged in production during the 1940s. The list is in two parts, Broadway and Off Broadway. Other names by which Broadway playhouses and selected Off-Broadway ones were known during the period are indicated in parentheses. Many Off-Broadway theatres were created from nontheatrical spaces or were simply halls or auditoriums borrowed for the occasion. If a play was produced there, it is listed. Names by which theatres still active were known in 1992 are italicized if such names were taken subsequent to the 1940s. An asterisk (*) denotes theatres no longer in legitimate theatre use or demolished. A few theatres listed here under Broadway were, by the 1940s, on the borderline between being classed as Broadway or Off Broadway. For example, while the President was technically a Broadway house, it housed for much of the decade a troupe consisting of the students of Erwin Piscator's Dramatic Workshop, and their work was generally considered in the same category as most Off-Broadway companies. Another small Broadway house that might fall in this indeterminate area was the Princess, here classed--with some reservations--as an Off-Broadway theatre. Madison Square Garden was (and still is) a sports arena, but was used at one point for the comedy show, Funzapoppin', thereby turning it into a Broadway venue. And the City Center was a large, nonprofit house in the Broadway vicinity, so it had Broadway status while operating on a separate contract from Broadway theatres. The list does not present every name by which Broadway theatres were known during their history.
BROADWAY
Adelphi Theatre*
Alvin Theatre (Neil Simon Theatre)
Ambassador Theatre
ANTA Theatre (Guild Theatre; Virginia Theatre)
Arena Theatre (Edison Hotel ballroom)
Belasco Theatre
Bijou Theatre
Biltmore Theatre
Booth Theatre
Broadhurst Theatre
Broadway Theatre
Center Theatre*
Century Theatre* (Jolson Theatre; Molly Picon Theatre; New Century Theatre;
Yiddish Art Theatre)
City Center of Music and Drama (Mecca Temple)

-839-

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The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note xiv
  • Introduction xv
  • Notes xlvii
  • The New York Stage, 1940-1950 1
  • A 3
  • B 51
  • C 93
  • D 143
  • E 179
  • F 193
  • G 221
  • I 293
  • J 315
  • L 341
  • M 383
  • N 443
  • O 461
  • P 491
  • Q 519
  • R 521
  • S 543
  • T 617
  • U 663
  • V 669
  • W 681
  • Y 711
  • Z 725
  • Appendixes 727
  • Appendix 1Calendar of Productions 729
  • Appendix 2 Play Categories 753
  • Appendix 5 Institutional Theatres 825
  • Appendix 7 Longest-Running Shows of the 1940s 833
  • Appendix 9 Seasonal Statistics 837
  • Appendix 10 Theatres 839
  • Selected Bibliography 843
  • Index of Titles 925
  • About the Author 947
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