Mark Twain and G. W. Cable: The Record of a Literary Friendship

By Mark Twain; George W. Cable et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
For a discussion of the "Drop Shot" column see my article "George Washington Cable's Literary Apprenticeship," The Louisiana Historical Quarterly, XXIV ( Jan., 1941), pp. 168-186.
2
Part of this letter is printed in L. L. C. Biklé, George W. Cable: His Life and Letters ( New York, 1928), pp. 69-70.
3
Chapters XLI-LI of Life on the Mississippi contain Mark Twain account of his visit in New Orleans.
4
This gathering was described in the New Orleans Times-Democrat of the day following. Mark Twain's stay in New Orleans was reported daily in the New Orleans newspapers, and those reports serve to fill in details between the lines of the account in Life on the Mississippi. See my article "Notes on Mark Twain in New Orleans," The McNeese Review, VI ( 1954), pp. 10-22.
5
Cable's speeches on these two occasions are printed later in this volume.
6
The letters in the Twain-Cable correspondence are included in Guy A. Cardwell, Twins of Genius ( East Lansing, Michigan, 1953).
7
Mark Twains' Letters, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine, I, ( New York, 1917), pp. 426-427. For a remark of Cable's on this occasion see pp. 18 and 130 of the present volume.
8
The story of Bras Coupé, an episode narrated in two chapters of The Grandissimes, tells of an African prince tragically broken in American slavery. Colossus is the servant of the backwoods preacher who is the title character in the short story "Posson Jone'." Joseph Frowenfeld and the Nancanou ladies are characters in The Grandissimes.
9
The Critic, III, ( March 24, 1883), pp. 130-131.
10
To save space, phrases of salutation and conclusion have usually been omitted from the letters.
11
Young daughter of Cable's widowed sister, Antoinette Cox. Portions of this letter and the one on April 5 are printed in Biklé, pp. 96-98.
12
James R. Osgood had come from Boston; George E. Waring, Jr., from Newport; Richard Watson Gilder, Roswell Smith, and Lawrence Hutton from New York.

-137-

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