INDEX.
ADAMS, HENRY, progenitor of the Adams family, 13.
Adams, John, value of his diary, 43; describes James Otis in the case of the writs of assistance, 44; writes the Braintree instructions in 1765, 53; supports the petition to the governor and council in 1765, 75; describes the Caucus Club, 76; removes to Boston and writes instructions for the representatives in 1768, 112; writes instructions for the representatives in 1769, 135; drives with Samuel Adams, 152; his account of Samuel Adams at the time of the Boston Massacre, 172; serves on the night-watch, 175; defends the soldiers, 183; gives aid in the controversy as to parliamentary authority, 210; presides at the Port Bill meeting in 1774, 293; elected delegate to the first Continental Congress, 295, etc.; sets out for Philadelphia, reports the journey in his diary, 309, etc.; his self- consciousness, 311; nominates Washington for commander-in- chief, 335; begins to favor independence in third Continental Congress, 341; on committee to prepare the Declaration of Independence, 348; the best debater in the early Congresses, 359; defends aristocracy in a controversy with Samuel Adams, 406.
Adams, Captain John, grandfather of Samuel Adams, 14.
Adams, Joseph, grandfather of President John Adams, 14.
Adams, Samuel, Senior, father of Samuel Adams, a political leader, his home and estate, justice of the peace, deacon, selectman, member of Assembly, helps form the Caulkers' Club, 15; opposes Governor Shute, 16; his prominence in time of Governor Shirley, 19; dies in 1748, 20.
Adams, Samuel, his parentage, 14; school days and college life, 16; his thesis as a Master of Arts, 17; tries law, mercantile life, 18; becomes his father's partner in a malt-house, 19; marries Elizabeth Checkley, 20; inherits a feud with Thomas Hutchinson, 34; attempt to seize and sell his property to close the Land Bank scheme, 35; accused of defalcation as tax-collector, 37, 47; shows marks of age at 42, death of his wife, failure in business, 46; writes town's instructions to the representatives in 1764, 47; marries Elizabeth Wells, 50; elected to Assembly in 1765, man of the townmeeting, 54; becomes the leader of the Assembly, 62; compared with James Otis, 63; opposes parliamentary representation of the colonies, 64, 67; writes the response to Bernard and the Massachusetts Resolves, 71; suggests the non-importation scheme, 74; his keenness in discovering able young men, 75; becomes clerk of the Assembly, 93; non-importation and non-consumption agreements adopted, 101; writes documents constituting the "True Sentiments of America," 103; denounces a Protestant episcopate, 104; writes the "Circular Letter" of 1768, 105; has words with James Otis, 113; his popularity with mechanics and laborers, 115; description of, in the affidavit of Richard Sylvester, 117; begins, in 1768, to work for

-433-

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