The Memoirs of William Jennings Bryan

By Mary Baird Bryan; William Jennings Bryan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX
THE FINAL YEARS

CHRONOLOGICALLY considered, the Democratic National Convention of 1920 at San Francisco takes first place in a record of Mr. Bryan's last five years.

I was glad Mr. Bryan made the campaign for delegate- at-large. It did him good to meet his old friends again. The result of this canvass made Mr. Bryan a delegate-at- large with ten of the sixteen delegates supporting him, a notable victory. Condensing the convention details, there was a strong movement in the Democratic party to stand for an increase in the alcoholic content of beer and wine, and many delegates had been chosen in harmony with that plan. The convention was "wet" and had no use for Mr. Bryan and his temperance policies. Mr. Bryan stood his ground, bringing in a minority report from the Comrnittee on Resolutions, and explaining the proposition included in this report. I append a brief extract from his remarks:

"On the night of the sixteenth day of last January when, at the nation's Capital, we celebrated the Pass- over from the old era to the new, I was honored by the leaders of this great cause with the privilege of being the last speaker at the meeting. I watched the clock, and when it was within one minute of the time when this nation would become saloonless for evermore, I quoted a passage from the Bible--the language in which the angel assured Joseph and Mary that it was safe to take the young child Jesus back to the Holy Land--you recall the words: 'They are dead that sought the young child's life.' [Applause.] When you remember that King Alcohol has slain a million more children than Herod

-472-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Memoirs of William Jennings Bryan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 562

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.