Anne Frank and After: Dutch Holocaust Literature in Historical Perspective

By Dick Van Galen Last; Rolf Wolfswinkel | Go to book overview

Chronology
1889 -- 20 April: Adolf Hitler born in Braunau-am-Inn, Austria
12 May: Otto Frank born in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany
1919 -- 11 November: End of First World War
1929 -- 12 June: Anneliese Marie Frank born in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany. Second child of Otto Frank and Edith Holländer (her sister Margot was born on 16 February 1926)
1933 -- 30 January: Adolf Hitler becomes Chancellor of Germany.
March: opening of first concentration camp: Dachau
December: Frank family moves to Amsterdam
1935 -- September: Nuremberg racial laws
1938 -- 9 November: Kristallnacht
1939 -- 1 September: Germany invades Poland: beginning of the Second World War
1940 -- 10 May: German invasion of Holland, Belgium and France
14 May: Bombardment of Rotterdam, next day Holland surrenders
1941 -- 25 February: February strike in Amsterdam
22 June: Hitler invades Russia
31 July: Goering assigns Heydrich to make all necessary preparations for a Gesamtlösung der Judenfrage im Deutschen Einflussgebiet in Europa (Comprehensive Solution of the Jewish Question in German-influenced Europe)
7 December: Pearl Harbour: America enters the Second World War
1942 -- 20 January: Wannsee Conference
March: Start of Operation Reinhard: mass-gassings begin in three extermination camps: Belzec (March), Sobibor (May) and Treblinka (July); Construction of Auschwitz II (Birkenau) Japan occupies the Dutch East Indies
May: Introduction of Jewish Yellow Star in Holland
6 July: Frank family goes into hiding -- Prinsengracht 263; one week later they are joined by the Van Pels family (in November 1942 a dentist, Fritz Pfeffer, comes to share the hiding-place)
July: Start of deportations from Westerbork

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