Cicero's de Oratore and Horace's Ars Poetica

By George Converse Fiske; Mary A. Grant | Go to book overview

INDEX
Academy, Academic philosophy, New and Old Academy, 15; Cicero's debt to, 17; importance to orator, 26; Antonius on value of, 28-29; source of argument to reconcile rhetoric and philosophy, 30; Crassus on importance of, 31-32; source of doctrine of propriety, 63; necessary for perfect orator, 126, 129. Cf. Plato.
Accius, metrical licences criticized by Horace, 106.
actio, treatment with regard to τὸ πρέπον, 56; necessity of constant practice in, 84; dependence on exercitatio, 88; place of treatment in De Oratore , 99; main discussion of, 113-114; forms transition to λέξις παθητική, 113; implicated with topic of operum colores, 113.
amplificatio, characteristic of grand style, 118-119; in Horace and Cicero, 119.
Annalis of Atticus, model of CiceroBrutus, 21.
Anonymus Iamblichi, on ϖύσις, μελέτη, έπιστήμη, 76, 77, 83.
Antiochus of Ascalon, possible source of Cicero's philosophic rhetoric, 14; heard by Cicero at Athens, 14; an eclectic popularizer of philosophy, 15; mediator between philosophy and rhetoric, 16; attitude to rhetorical manuals, 16; advocated study of philosophy for orator, 16, 26; used Tοπικά of Aristotle, 16; possibly influenced De Finibus , n. 10 on 29; possible source of De Or . III, 56-143, n. 11 on 30.
Antonius, speaker in De Oratore , passim.
Apollonius of Alabanda, quoted in De Oratore , 60.
Arcesilas, founder of New Academy, 31.
Aristotle, relation to Roman rhetoric, 7; essential agreement with Plato obscured by Zeno, 15; Tοπικά of, 16, 28-29, 31; on τὸ πρέπον, 44, 49, 53; theory of ᾐθος and πάθος derived from, 47, 48, 114, 116; on position of Homer, 48; simile of citharoedus in, n. 63 on 61; definition of virtue, 67; on relation between poetry and rhetoric, 70, 121; 126. Cf. Peripatos and Peripatetic philosophy.
Artemon, on structure of dramatic dialogue, 23.
ars, value to orator in comparison with ingenium, 83, 86. Cf. τέχνη and ϕύσις, μελέτη, έπιστήμη.
ars ornate dicendi, place of treatment in De Oratore , 99; importance of in De Oratore, 106-107.
Ars Poetica , influence of Hellenistic rhetoric on, 7; protreptic in character, 22; similarities in structure and content with De Oratore and Orator , 23, 33, 99, 100, and passim; necessity of study of philosophy emphasized in, 26, 32, 33; use of minor arts as ilustrations in, 37; doctrine of propriety in, 46, 47, 48; "external" propriety, 49; propriety of sermo, 50; proprieties of audience, εἰ + ̑δος, time, speaker, place in, 53-58; propriety of proem, 61-62; vir ineptus in, 63; proprieties of age, time, 65-66; treatment of τὸ πρέπον in satyr play, tragedy, and comedy, 111-113; problem of imitation treated in, 48; treatment of ᾐθος in, 49; of ᾐθος and πάθος, 116- 117; of ordo, 50-51, 103-105; to be classified as λὸγος πρὸς τοὺς ἀκρςατάς, 53; ideas of unity and

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Cicero's de Oratore and Horace's Ars Poetica
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Prefatory Note 3
  • Table of Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • Chapter I Cicero's De Oratore and Orator 11
  • Chapter II De Arte 26
  • Chapter III De Artifice 74
  • Chapter IV Perfect Poet and Perfect Orator 120
  • Summary 134
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 143
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