Western Lands and the American Revolution

By Thomas Perkins Abernethy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
THE TREATY OF 1783 AND THE WEST

DURING 1780 Franklin's situation at Passy underwent marked changes. Having been recalled by Congress, Arthur Lee prepared to return to America in the spring of that year, and Samuel Wharton and Thomas Hutchins planned to sail with him on the privateer frigate Alliance. Captain Hutchins had just been caught redhanded in his spying and speculating activities in London, and much of his correspondence with Wharton seized. After having been imprisoned for a time he was released and ordered by the British to join his regiment and sail for America, but gave it out that he had gone to Wales for his health. He hinted at a journey to Russia also, but actually he went to Paris and put himself under the protecting wing of Franklin. Bearing a letter of recommendation from the philosopher to Congress, he presently appeared before that body and was commissioned geographer of the United States and assigned to General Greene's army in the South.1

There was considerable difficulty over the sailing of the Alliance because Arthur Lee insisted that Congress had commissioned Captain Landais to command, while Franklin had put the ship under command of Captain John Paul Jones. Wharton finally was left behind, but made the crossing later in the year and was soon traitorously engaged in sending information to the British. During 1782 he and Arthur Lee faced each other again as members of Congress.2

As soon as Lee reached Philadelphia he submitted his accounts to Congress on October 17, 1780, and asked for a hearing, since he assumed that his recall implied censure of his conduct. He submitted also the be-

____________________
1
Edward Williams to "Monsieur Chevalier," Feb. 22, 1780, Hutchins MSS., H.S.P.; same to Mons. P. Steptoe, March 13, 1780, ibid.; P. Drouillard to Hutchins, March 20, 1780, ibid.; Bigelow, Works of Franklin, VIII, 203-204; Journals of the Continental Congress, XIX, 187, XX, 475-476, 738.
2
Arthur Lee to President of Congress, Aug. 13, 1781, Arthur Lee MSS., Harvard U. library; John Bondfield to Arthur Lee, April 15, 1780, ibid.; Lee, Arthur Lee, pp. 83, 272; Wharton to Franklin, May 15, 1780, Franklin MSS., XVIII, 86, A.P.S.; same to same, June 14, 1780, ibid., XVIII, 141; same to same, Oct. 5, 1780, ibid., XX, 13; Franklin to Coffyn, June 13, 1781, Franklin MSS., Misc. II, L. of C.; Cont. Cong. MSS., 193, ff. 73, 77, 89, 93, 97; Ford, Letters of Joseph Jones, pp. 68-70; Ford, Letters of William Lee, III, 800-801n., 851; Bigelow, Works of Franklin, VIII, 263-264; Isham, Deane Papers, I, 446-448; S (amuel) W (harton) to D. C (onway?), Jan. 25, 1781, P.R.O., C.O., series 5, 101, f. 529; ibid., f. 533.

-274-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Western Lands and the American Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 410

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.