George Herbert: His Religion and Art

By Joseph H. Summers | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
BACON AND HERBERT

GEORGE HERBERT and Francis Bacon had more in common than is generally recognized. The poems and letters which Herbert addressed to Bacon show a close knowledge of what the Lord Chancellor had written. In the short "Ad Autorem Instaurationis Magnae" ( Works, p. 435), Herbert celebrated Bacon's 'killing' of the ancients, 'so splendidly and agreeably' that they must consider burial as a gift. His comment in "In Honorem, Verulamij" ( Works, pp. 436-37) was more flattering and more specific:

Who passes yonder? his is not a face
Of every day. You know not him? then hear.
The Prince of Theories, the High Priest of Truth,
Lord of Induction, and of Verulam,
Master of the Universe, but not of Arts;
The Pine-tree of Profundity and Grace;
Nature's particular Augur, Chronicle
Of Science, Courier of Experiment;
Equity's standard-bearer; he that found
Poor Science chained from undergraduate hope,
And set her free; Promus of Light; that drove
Before him all our Phantoms and our Clouds;
Colleague o' the Sun; and Square of Certitude;
The Sophist's scourge; the literary Brutus,
Ending the tyrannies of Authority;
Of Thought and Sense stupendous Arbiter,
The Reason's whetstone; of Physics very Atlas,
To whom the Stagirite bowed his giant strength;
A Noah's Dove, who in old age perceiving
No place nor rest for's Art, chose for himself
Thus to return to his maternal Ark.
The text of Subtilty, the child of Time,
His mother Truth; the Hive of Honey'd Wit;

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Herbert: His Religion and Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • I 9
  • Chapter I Time and the Temple 11
  • Chapter II The Life 29
  • Chapter III Religion 49
  • II 71
  • Chapter IV The Conception of Form 73
  • Chapter V The Proper Language 95
  • III 121
  • Chapter VI The Poem as Hieroglyph 123
  • Chapter VIII Music 156
  • Appendix A- 'Mr Herbert's Temple & Church Militant Explained and Improved' 191
  • Appendix B- Bacon and Herbert 195
  • Abbreviations Used in Notes 198
  • Notes to Chapter I 199
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.