Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X.

Rev. Dr. Smith, Apostle of Slavery--" Grace Greenwood"--Truth and "the Truth"--Frederick Circuit, Maryland--Home and Garden-- Black Becky--My Sermon on Peace--Samuel Tyler--Mental Sufferings--First Love Clouded--A Sermon at Carlisle--Essays on Jesuitism--" Without the Camp"--My New Creed--In Baltimore with Unitarians and Quakers--Sylvester Judd--Dr. Burnap-- Death of Becky--Leaving Methodism--Partings.

THE Baltimore Conference ( February, 1852) gave me Frederick Circuit, now "Liberty Circuit," in Frederick County, Md. Heavyhearted for the loss of my brother, I started from home, March 26, for my new field.

On the Potomac boat I met Rev. Dr. William Smith ( Methodist), president of Randolph-Macon College, Virginia, distinguished by his propaganda of a new pro-slavery sociology. We had some conversation, and he asked me, "What is the principle of slavery?" I answered, "It has no principle." He said, "The principle of slavery is clearly the submission of one will to another, and government is inconceivable without it.""Then," said I, "government is inconceivably wrong." He said, "You ought to marry Fanny Wright. The best government is where the two elements of slavery and freedom balance. I only wish I had you in my senior class, to which I lecture on this subject every week."

Thus were the winds sown from which whirlwinds were presently reaped!*

I was not much interested in the territorial restriction of

____________________
*
A quarter of a century later there came to my house in London a lady from Virginia who had fads that would have astounded Fanny Wright, among others a belief that by a certain moral and mental and physical regimen death might be entirely escaped. My wife became rather fond of her. She wrote a little book on the subject which she wished to sell, and we bought copies to aid her. She was a daughter of Dr. William Smith, the pro-slavery apostle.

-101-

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Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Dedication and Preface. vii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 19
  • Chapter IV 32
  • Chapter V 43
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 58
  • Chapter IX 86
  • Chapter X 101
  • Chapter XI 112
  • Chapter XII 126
  • Chapter XIII 139
  • Chapter XIV 156
  • Chapter XV 165
  • Chapter XVI 179
  • Chapter XVII 196
  • Chapter XVIII 222
  • Chapter XIX 243
  • Chapter XX 259
  • Chapter XXI 281
  • Chapter XXII 302
  • Chapter XXIII 324
  • Chapter XXIV 345
  • Chapter XXV 351
  • Chapter XVII 362
  • Chapter XXVII 387
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