Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI.

Parting from Methodism--Pains of New Birth--John Minor--"The Blithedale Romance"--Last Sermon--Partings--Hearing Thackeray--Dr. Crooks--Theodore Parker--Father Taylor--Ways and Means--My Organ--A Visit to Concord--Hawthorne--First Meeting with Emerson.

ON leaving Washington for Falmouth I again had a narrow escape; on the Potomac bridge my horse was frightened by an approaching steamer and tried to leap into the river, getting almost over.

From December 15, 1852, when I reached the old home at Falmouth, to February 14, 1853, when I left for Cambridge, my old journal is a sort of herbarium of the thorns that pierced father, mother, and myself.

A cruel side of the situation was that my new steps had the appearance of being merely metaphysical. I was breaking my parents' hearts--so it seemed--on abstract and abstruse issues, while really I was aiming at a new world. But this new world was of such a serious character--the abolition of slavery, to begin with--that any intimation of it only made the doctrinal heresies more painful.

Once more on Christmas Day I heard the angel singing in old St. George's "Glad tidings of great joy I bring to you and all mankind"; once more I knelt with my parents on watch-night and sang the Covenant hymn, "Come let us anew our journey pursue"; and once more went out on New Year's Day--hiring day--and wrote in my journal:--

I feel to-night somewhat sad. I find how little sympathy I have with the existing state of things. As I saw the slave-hiring to-day, I found out how much hatred I had of the institution--and how much contempt for the persons engaged in it. "You look," said a friend, "as if you were not in the world." I am not. My dear relatives and friends cannot sympathise with and encourage the

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Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Dedication and Preface. vii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 19
  • Chapter IV 32
  • Chapter V 43
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 58
  • Chapter IX 86
  • Chapter X 101
  • Chapter XI 112
  • Chapter XII 126
  • Chapter XIII 139
  • Chapter XIV 156
  • Chapter XV 165
  • Chapter XVI 179
  • Chapter XVII 196
  • Chapter XVIII 222
  • Chapter XIX 243
  • Chapter XX 259
  • Chapter XXI 281
  • Chapter XXII 302
  • Chapter XXIII 324
  • Chapter XXIV 345
  • Chapter XXV 351
  • Chapter XVII 362
  • Chapter XXVII 387
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