Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX.

Art in Cincinnati--Journalism--A Spiritualist Apostle--Theodore Parker --A Conflict among Unitarian Alumni--Letter from Martineau-- The Raid of John Brown--My Condemnation of the Crime, and my Retreat--The "Infidels"--The "Tom Paine" Mythology-- Sermon on Paine--Secession from my Church--The Monthly Dial --W. D. Howells--My Tale of Excalibur--Frothingham's Articles --Letter of Emerson, and his Contributions to my Dial-- Notable Papers--The Welcome to Hawthorne.

IN later years Cincinnati became celebrated for its art collections. There was an English artist there, Henry Worrall, a man of fine wit, around whom we formed a little "U & I" society. Our artists brought to its weekly evenings quaint sketches and the rest of us literary fancies. I contributed a half-humorous, half-philosophical series, "Dr. Einbohrer and his Pupils," which I have at times thought of printing on account of the pen-and- ink illustrations inserted by Worrall.

There is in the Catholic cathedral at Cincinnati a large picture by Haydon, the subject being the entrance of Jesus into Jerusalem seated on an ass. I was told that the picture had reached an American port in a slightly damaged condition, and the importer parted with it at a reduced price. The figures in it, however, were in good condition, and I found some symbolism in it. Among those surrounding Jesus the artist painted a devout disciple with the face of Wordsworth, and a scoffing Sadducee with the face of Voltaire. Voltaire has his chin too high in the air to see Jesus exactly, and Wordsworth bends so low that his worship seems rather to the ass than to the man on it. At that time I retained some ignorant prejudices against Voltaire, and identified Wordsworth with "The Lost Leader" of Browningmore literally than was just. Haydon's picture gave me the theme of a sermon, which when reported pleased the Catholics by exciting interest in their picture; but it dis

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Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Dedication and Preface. vii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 19
  • Chapter IV 32
  • Chapter V 43
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 58
  • Chapter IX 86
  • Chapter X 101
  • Chapter XI 112
  • Chapter XII 126
  • Chapter XIII 139
  • Chapter XIV 156
  • Chapter XV 165
  • Chapter XVI 179
  • Chapter XVII 196
  • Chapter XVIII 222
  • Chapter XIX 243
  • Chapter XX 259
  • Chapter XXI 281
  • Chapter XXII 302
  • Chapter XXIII 324
  • Chapter XXIV 345
  • Chapter XXV 351
  • Chapter XVII 362
  • Chapter XXVII 387
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