Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIV.

Foreign Complications--My Excursion to England--Incidents of the Voyage--Mill on Liberty--Welcome in London--Sojourn at Aubrey House--Miss Cobbe--W. M. Evarts--Visit to Cambridge University --Henry Fawcett and Leslie Stephen.

ABOUT this time complications with England were arising; our golden hour for ending at once both the war and slavery had passed. The leaden hour had come; we were compelled to support the war which the President had made our only hope of eradicating slavery, the root of discord. There was danger that this hope might be lost through the diversion of patriotic wrath from slavery to a traditional foreign enemy. Even Gladstone and Lord John Russell had accepted seriously the instructed protests of our foreign Ministers that "the condition of slavery in the several States will remain just the same whether it [the war for the Union] succeed or fail." The Confederates in England were utilising the diplomatic declarations of our government favourable to slavery, confirmed by its actions and by our anti-slavery protests. The anti-slavery leaders in America were in constant correspondence with George Thompson and other friends in England who, like ourselves, had felt sure that slavery would certainly be destroyed by the war.

It was at this juncture that it was proposed to me to give lectures for a few months in England.

In February, 1863, my wife wrote in her diary at Concord now before me: " Wendell Phillips came to me to ask if I would consent to my husband going to Europe to lecture and persuade the English that the North is right. Reluctantly I consented, feeling that as he was exempt from serving as a soldier I had no right to prevent his being of service in some other way."

It is probable also that my wife thought that the strain of work on me was too great. While editing the Commonwealth I was preaching every Sunday and lecturing one or two nights of

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.