Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVII.

Arrival of my Family in England--Interview with Minister Adams-- Sermons at South Place Chapel--Beecher in London--Rev. F. D. Maurice--Maurice's Novel, "Eustace Conway"--Madox Brown's Picture of Maurice and Carlyle--America in the Pantomimes-- ProfessorNewman and his Catholic Brother--Letters and Talks of Professor Newman--Dr. Newman in his Oratory--Elizabeth Garrett Studying Medicine--Mrs. Fawcett--Legal Disabilities of Women.

BUT London as well as Venice had affectionate hearts. Aubrey House and its exquisite garden was also a dreamland, especially when I found there letters from America assuring me that the "momentary annoyance"--so Phillips called it--at my Mason correspondence had passed away, and that my letters to the Commonwealth were valued. My wife had proudly offered to close my connection with that paper, but editor Sanborn and the rest insisted on its continuance.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Malleson, being absent from London, desired me to bring my family to occupy their house until their return. These friends were connected with South Place Chapel, from which I received an invitation to give there some discourses. The week preceding the arrival of my family was passed in the north of Ireland in response to an invitation from the Neills of Belfast. I had met Miss Dora Neill (now Mrs. Dulany of California) when we were both visiting Theodore Weld's school at Eagleswood, N.J. She and her sister, Mrs. Sherwood, took me on an excursion which included the Giant's Causeway, and I became well posted in Irish customs and in the peculiar demerits of the low-backed car.

At last I!

From the tender I saw my wife and children smiling down on me from the deck of the Arabia, and every cloud of care floated into light.

-387-

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