The Spyglass, Views and Reviews, 1924-1930: Selected and Edited by John Tyree Fain

By Donald Davidson | Go to book overview

Tragedy of Limitation: Tarkington and Hemingway Spyglass January 22, 1928

Booth Tarkington's remarkable gift for making commonplace people interesting was never more evident than in this new novel, Claire Ambler, which has just been issued as the first publication of the Doubleday-Doran merger. As in The Plutocrat, the theme is (at least in large part) the performance of an American type in contact with European civilization. But the protagonist of Claire Ambler is an American girl, beautiful and wealthy, as confident of the power of her beauty as the Plutocrat was of the all- sufficiency of his riches and vulgar directness. And the book, though it plays lightly back and forth between satire and pure comedy, also leans towards tragedy. It might be called a tragicomedy, and it would be a tragicomedy of limitations, or rather of not knowing limitations, for the winsome Claire Ambler, with typical American blindness, never for a moment dreams that European males have a psychology in any respect different from the psychology of the youngsters back in the old home town in the States. Her straightforward coquetry, operating in a Mediterranean summer resort, therefore produces the most surprising results, and she has to learn a difficult lesson.

Observe the beauty and simplicity of Mr. Tarkington's methods. His novel is in effect a shrewd criticism of the typical American girl--not the vulgar title-hunter, but the typical fair daughter of any wealthy dad who is bullied into paying for a European jaunt. But most readers, I dare say, will be taken up with the story and the delightful chatter (quite empty, most of k) in which all the American characters indulge, without ever perceiving the true inwardness

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Spyglass, Views and Reviews, 1924-1930: Selected and Edited by John Tyree Fain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.