A Short History of Italian Painting

By Alice Van Vechten Brown; William Rankin | Go to book overview
Save to active project

SIENA FROM ABOUT 1400 TO 15001

I

MEANWHILE Siena, even on the verge of the Early Renaissance, had been conserving her Mediæval ideals. Sassetta was the last great painter of the earlier period, the period between Giotto and Leonardo, when the rest of Italy was largely Giottesque or was awakening to the scientific study of nature. Yet Sienese art proceeded on its uninterrupted course, throwing out influences upon Umbria, North Italy, even upon Florence, but accepting little in return. Siena could not indeed be wholly untouched. An example is the illuminator GIOVANNI DI PAOLO ( 1403?- 1482).2 Beginning as a pupil of Sassetta, he later went to Florence, and is constantly found imitating someone--as Sassetta or Taddeo, Gentile da Fabriano or Fra Angelico. He is sometimes Duccesque or bizarre, but his best pictures exhibit a rare individual note, as the Predella of the Saracini collection.3 Compared, however, to the great doings elsewhere, the artists of Siena, though often travelled and sometimes imitating, more than ever give an impression of a lovely decorative school rather than of individual achievement.4 While there are able painters and much distinction in style and even a certain naturalism, their work in general presents the effect of an inbred school drawing toward its close.


II

Sassetta had two leading pupils -- Sano di Pietro and Vecchietta.5

Sano di Pietro ( 1406-1481), the maker of pious altarpieces,

____________________
1
See Perkins, arts. in Burl. Mag., Rass. d'A., Rass. Senese, etc; C. & C. ( Hutton and Douglas eds.), who cite sources and discuss works at length; also Hey. and Ol.
2
For miniature work see L'Arte, VII, 384. For works at Rome, 303-8.
3
See Nativity, Vatican, pub. in Rass. d'A, IX, 114.
4
In architecture the work is individual and distinguished.
5
We follow Mr. Perkins in this classification.

-148-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Short History of Italian Painting
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 418

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.