Early Christian Origins: Studies in Honor of Harold R. Willoughby

By Allen Wikgren | Go to book overview

IV
RESURRECTION IN THE EARLY CHURCH

Rodney Branton COLGATE-ROCHESTER DIVINITY SCHOOL

Any student of the New Testament sees at once that the Resurrection is so embedded in the life and preaching of the early church that without it there would have been no church and no preaching. The evidence of the Synoptic Gospels shows clearly that without the experience of the Resurrection the demoralized disciples would never have become the apostles of a gospel that swept across their world like wildfire. The Resurrection is the one adequate explanation of the Christian Church. When the group, after its shock at the crucifixion, reassembled in Jerusalem, the Resurrection was the central topic of the preaching. The sermons in Acts are built around the affirmation, "God hath raised him from the dead . . of that we are witnesses."

The entire New Testament supports this point of view. Paul states the case pointedly when he says, "If Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. . . . If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins" ( 1 Cor. 15:14-17). Paul is not here defending the Resurrection nor defining it. Rather, it is assumed, and from such an assumption he argues for the resurrection of all Christians. This is a definite indication that the Resurrection of Christ is held by the Pauline churches as an accepted fact of supreme importance. The importance of the fact is further affirmed in another passage where Paul, reflecting a more primitive idea than his own, states that Jesus, who according to the flesh was a son of David, was by the Resurrection designated the Son of God ( Rom. 1:1-4). But the Resurrection for Paul is not only of great Christological significance; it plays a great role also in the saving act of God, where it is the pivotal point. By it, man is himself raised to new life that is death-defying. "We were baptized into his death . . . our old self was crucified with

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Early Christian Origins: Studies in Honor of Harold R. Willoughby
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.