Early Christian Origins: Studies in Honor of Harold R. Willoughby

By Allen Wikgren | Go to book overview

HAROLD RIDEOUT WILLOUGHBY

Harold Rideout Willoughby was born in North Haverhill, New Hampshire, on March 3, 1890. After receiving the A.B. degree ( 1915) and an M.A. degree in Classics ( 1916) at Wesleyan University, he took a B.D. degree in 1918 from Garrett Biblical Institute. He also held the positions of Squire Teaching Fellow in Greek at Wesleyan University ( 1915-16) and Gustavus F. Swift Fellow at American University ( 1919-20). He then came as a student to the University of Chicago, where he pursued work in the Divinity School with specialization in New Testament studies. Following an interruption by World War I, in which he served as a chaplain and a sergeant in the field artillery, he completed his academic course and received the Ph.D. degree summa cum laude in 1924. In the same year he was appointed to the faculty of the Divinity School and the Department of New Testament and Early Christian Literature at the University of Chicago. After an eventful and distinguished career of over thirty years he reached retirement age and on July 1, 1955, became Professor Emeritus of Early Christian Origins.

Special honors which have come to him include election to Phi Beta Kappa, eight special lectureships, two honorary degrees (D.D., Litt.D.), and membership in a dozen learned societies. Of these and other activities one may read in Who's Who in America, World Biography, and similar sources. The scholarly and wide-ranging aspects of his special interests are evident in the bibliography of his writings which accompanies this sketch. Among these special concerns one may mention particularly his notable contributions in areas of early Christian origins and backgrounds, exemplified by his widely known Pagan Regeneration, and in New Testament and Byzantine art and iconography, exemplified by such studies as that of the Rockefeller-McCormick New Testament, and in Early Christian archeology and English Bible. During his presidency of the Chicago Society of Biblical Research in 1945-46 he conceived and carried to subsequent publication the monumental symposium, The Study of the Bible Today and Tomorrow. As may be seen also from

-150-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Early Christian Origins: Studies in Honor of Harold R. Willoughby
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.