A History of Danish Literature

By Sven H. Rossel | Go to book overview

2
From the Reformation to the Baroque

F. J. Billeskov Jansen


THE LUTHERAN REFORMATION

At the threshold of the sixteenth century, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden were three kingdoms united under the Danish king. The Kalmar Union, created in 1397 and later broken, was reestablished in 1497. But by 1500 the dominance of the Danish king and nobility had already weakened. A campaign that was meant to force the little north German province of the Ditmarshes into submission under the Danish Crown ended catastrophically. During a battle in the marshes facing the North Sea, the inhabitants opened the floodgates so that the sea rushed in. The charging cavalry in heavy armor became easy prey for the Ditmarshers, who used their spears as poles to vault over the muddy dikes. Rumor of the defeat induced Sweden to secede, and although this country was subject to the Danish king for a short period in 1520-21, the separation was in reality completed and a national antagonism established as well. Thus in the following centuries Sweden received its cultural impulses from other sources, avoiding Denmark, while Denmark and Norway, which remained united until 1814, essentially shared destinies, not least in the relation between religion and politics.

Despite periods of profound setback, caused especially by the military ambitions of the Crown, the double monarchy Denmark-Norway, together with the partly German-speaking regions of Schleswig, Holstein, Oldenburg, and others, was a highly respected monarchy; its prestige even survived the painful loss of the rich provinces of Skåne, Halland, and Blekinge, which Sweden conquered in 1658.

The Reformation in Denmark in 1536 was a revolution, an upheaval of values of all sorts. The new faith evoked a storm of exultation in the minds of many, coinciding with shifts among the social classes. It was a time of unrest

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Danish Literature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 714

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.