John Donne: His Flight from Mediaevalism

By Michael Francis Moloney | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
SUMMARY

THIS STUDY is an attempt to establish Donne's relation to the conflict, current in his generation, between mediaeval and renaissance thought, and to determine the effect, if any, which Donne's suffrages in the situation which confronted him, had upon the subsequent course of English poetry.

The nature of the subject has made necessary a rather complete analysis and evaluation of modern criticism of Donne which has covered a wide range since the revival of this poet was begun by Grosart's edition of the 1870's. So far as my particular problem was concerned the two poles of that criticism were represented, on the one hand by W. J. Courthope and, on the other, by Miss Mary Paton Ramsay, whose French dissertation, Les doctrines médiévales chez Donne, appearing in 1917, advanced the rather startling theory that Donne was a true child of the Middle Ages and that he was to be understood only by tracing his origins to their mediaeval sources. The abyss which separates the critical position of Miss Ramsay from that of Courthope is to be explained only by the recognition of the divergence between their respective evaluations of the civilization to which Donne was heir. The heart of that civilization, of course, was the Thomistic philosophy, the resurgence of which has been a notable feature of the twentieth century.

My own position represents a mean between that of Courthope and that of Miss Ramsay. I have not hesitated to say that the former, by facilely reading into Donne and his era the atmosphere of religious panic which prevailed in Victorian England after materialistic science had launched its frontal attack on the Christian faith and the Essays and Reviews--and kindred works--had undermined it from within, has scarcely taken an unimpeachable viewpoint. I have insisted that it is a mistake to push Donne's break with mediaeval thought to the point where he is made to appear confused and dismayed by the "new science" of his day; that his interest in that science, particularly in the new astronomy, was rather a popular and poetic interest whereby he caught up new ideas, toyed with them, wove them into the fabric of his poetry, but at no time saw in them a challenge to the stability of traditional Christianity.

But if Courthope erred in one direction, Miss Ramsay, I have felt,

-210-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Donne: His Flight from Mediaevalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword 7
  • Contents 11
  • Chapter I - The Life and Times 13
  • Chapter II - The Mind of Donne: the New Science 47
  • Chaptep III - Mediaeval Synthesis and Renaissance Dichotomy 69
  • Chapter IV - Donne and the Rival Idealisms 105
  • Chapter V - The Heart of the Struggle 129
  • Chapter VI - Donne's Mysticism 165
  • Chapter VII - In the Wake of Donne 196
  • Chapter VIII - Summary 210
  • Bibliography 214
  • Index 220
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.