Beijing Spring, 1989: Confrontation and Conflict: the Basic Documents

By Michel Oksenberg; Lawrence R. Sullivan et al. | Go to book overview

These events have very profound causes. Unless the problem is solved from within the party and from the root, the problem cannot be solved at all.


50
Main Points of Yang Shangkun's Speech at Emergency Enlarged Meeting of the Central Military Commission

Source: Ming pao (Enligtenment) ( Hong Kong) ( May 29, 1989): 1-2; FBIS, May 30, pp. 17-20.

([ Ming pao] editor's note: This is a speech given by Yang Shangkun, executive vice chairman of the Central Military Commission at an emergency enlarged meeting of the Military Commission on May 24. It was originally entitled, "Main Points of Comrade Yang Shangkun's Speech at Emergency Enlarged Meeting of Central Military Commission on May 24, 1989, Edited from the Transcript." The subheads are ours.)


Is This State of Affairs Still Not a Disturbance?

The Military Commission has decided to convene an emergency enlarged meeting and ask the principal responsible comrades of all major units to attend. The principal aim is to tell you one thing: that the present situation in Beijing is still chaotic. Although martial law has been declared, some of the martial law tasks have in fact not been carried out. Some army units enforcing martial law have been blocked, and they have not forcibly passed through, in order to avoid direct confrontation. Through great effort, most units have not entered their predetermined positions. The situation was even more chaotic a few days ago. No vehicle bearing a military plate could pass through. Is this state of affairs still not a disturbance? The situation in the capital is precisely a disturbance. This disturbance has not subsided.

There have been ups and downs in the student movement in the past month and more. Generally speaking, it is moving upward. Since Comrade Yaobang's death, the slogans in the streets have changed several times. When Comrade

-320-

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