Beijing Spring, 1989: Confrontation and Conflict: the Basic Documents

By Michel Oksenberg; Lawrence R. Sullivan et al. | Go to book overview

62
The Judgment of History Will Be Severe

KUNG YAO-WEN

Source: Ta kung pao ( Hong Kong) ( June 4, 1989): 2; FBIS, June 5, pp. 23-24.

Gunshots finally were heard in Tiananmen Square, Beijing, last night. The triggers were pulled by the troops enforcing martial law, the so-called "People's Army." Initial reports indicate that scores of people, students and Beijing citizens, were shot dead. Here is the iron-clad evidence: The Chinese people in Tiananmen Square shed blood, when ruthless bullets pierced the bodies of students and citizens. Alas! Things should have worsened to such a condition! The day June 3, 1989, is one that all Chinese nations wept for the tragedy that took place in Tiananmen and will go down in Chinese history. Those who have committed this error will come under the judgment of history.

Guns were fired, and batons, tear gas, and armored vehicles were used. We can well imagine what a scene it was!

Disregarding objective facts, turning a blind eye on the reality in which a million of Beijing's residents, out of indignation, dashed ahead regardless of their safety to protect the students on consecutive evenings, the Beijing authorities insist that "a small group of people have premeditated to create disturbances to expand turmoil." They have even said that "the graveness of the behavior of a small group of people violating the law has gone beyond our endurance. . . ." In line with this tone, a murderous note could keenly be felt in the June 3 urgent circular issued by the headquarters of the troops enforcing martial law, and the curse between their teeth: "Nobody should illegally stop military vehicles under whatever pretext, obstruct and besiege the People's Liberation Army, or prevent the troops enforcing martial law from exercising their duties. . . . Should anyone pay no heed to our persuasion, cling obstinately to his course, and defy the law, the troops enforcing martial law, public security cadres and police, and the Armed Police Corps are authorized to adopt all measures to deal with him by force; the organizers and trouble-makers will have to bear responsibility for all consequences." It actually means: "Kill on the spot with the authority of the law."

Anyone who is objective and knows something about Beijing's situation cannot but pose the question: Was it necessary to dispatch the troops enforcing martial law? Who is exercising dictatorship on whom? The majority of the students in Tiananmen Square have pulled out in recent days. Remaining there

-393-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beijing Spring, 1989: Confrontation and Conflict: the Basic Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.