Beijing Spring, 1989: Confrontation and Conflict: the Basic Documents

By Michel Oksenberg; Lawrence R. Sullivan et al. | Go to book overview

65
Denouncing the Li-Yang Clique, Traitors to the People

Source: Wen wei po editorial ( Hong Kong) ( June 5, 1989): 2; FBIS, June 5, pp. 8-9.

June 4 was a bitter day of wholesale massacre in Beijing. Flying in the face of the will of the people and dispatching tanks, armored cars, and machine guns under the public gaze, the Li-Yang [ Li Peng-Yang Shangkun] clique carried out a bloody suppression of the unarmed students and residents striving for democracy, resulting in a major tragedy in which over 1,000 people were killed and over 10,000 people were wounded. Under these circumstances, what lies before the Chinese people is no longer a question of calling for their downfall but for a public trial of this group of traitors to the people.

In modern history, Beijing city has undergone numerous calamities, none of which has been as tragic as this. When Japan invaded China and entered Beijing city, it did not carry out a massacre like this. In the later period of the civil war, Beijing city was peacefully liberated. The liberation army entering the city did not fire a single shot. Neither during the invasions of foreign enemies or during the civil wars did a real war bring massacres of such scale to Beijing. However, such a tragedy has happened on the 40th anniversary of the founding of the PRC. This has bitterly disappointed all good and honest people, but is not understood by the vast numbers of CPC members and soldiers.

The people cannot forgive the Li-Yang clique because the people have given them many opportunities that they have rejected. They have entirely changed into the opposite of the people and taken a path alienating themselves from the people.

When the student movement started, the students did not make excessive demands. Out of the need to create party strife, however, the Li-Yang clique intentionally procrastinated and refused to accept the students' demands. This tended to intensify the students' attitude. When the situation grew more serious, people from all circles in society stepped forward to mediate. Some members of the National People's Congress Standing Committee also issued a call. But they were also rejected by the Li-Yang clique. Thus, the Li-Yang clique missed the opportunity.

Zhao Ziyang's speech on May 4 was well received by the people of the country. The students also wanted to return to school and, while resuming classes, continue to hold dialogues with the government. However, out of the need to create party strife, the Li-Yang clique again gave up this chance by categorically rejecting it.

-397-

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