Andrew Johnson: Plebeian and Patriot

By Robert W. Winston | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
FIGHT FOR TENNESSEE

With a divided North on his hands Lincoln's task was delicate and difficult. He knew not which way to turn. Being both wise and cautious, however, he concluded that the first thing was to get the lay of the land, and not to formulate a policy till he knew all the facts. One thing at least was clear, he must play for time, and by no means was he to offend the Border States. Then, too, he must hold in line northern Union Democrats, such as Douglas and Pugh, and southern Whigs, such as Bell, Gilmer and Stephens. Andrew Johnson's bold, defiant utterances, though cheering and stimulating, were pre- mature and rather warlike. Lincoln would wait for a united North and he would put the South in the wrong by making her the aggressor. As to succoring the Charleston forts, Seward might toll that matter along, encouraging the South Carolina Commissioners to think the forts would be evacuated. At the right time he could fortify or evacuate as the state of the country demanded.1

Secretary Stanton who, in Buchanan's cabinet, had been a tower of strength for the Union, was now in opposition. He had been left out of the Lincoln cabinet and was pouting. Double-faced, tyrannical and with an inordinate desire for office, this strange man set about undermining Lincoln's administration. Almost daily he was writing to Buchanan, his old chief, belittling Lincoln and lauding Buchanan and the Buchanan administration.2 His pet term for Lincoln was "a gorilla." "Why should Paul du Chaillu have to go to Africa for an ape?" he asked. "He has a better specimen in Washington."3

____________________
1
Rhodes, Vol. III, p. 345; Douglas states that Lincoln promised to evacuate, but Rhodes discounts this statement. Douglas recommended evacuation.
2
Blaine, Vol. II, p. 563.
3
Welles, Vol. I, XXXI; D. M. DeWitt, Impeachment, p. 260. Subsequently Stanton became the "Great War Secretary" under Lincoln--perhaps the most efficient officer in Lincoln's cabinet.

-188-

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Andrew Johnson: Plebeian and Patriot
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I: Odds - 1808-1860 1
  • Chapter I - Runaway Apprentice 3
  • Chapter II - A. Johnson, Tailor 15
  • Chapter III - Successor to Andrew Jackson 26
  • Chapter IV - Congressman 40
  • Chapter V - On the Stump 58
  • Chapter VI - Governor and Senator 76
  • Chapter VII - Home Life 95
  • Chapter VIII - Jeff Davis Spoils the Broth 108
  • Chapter IX - Father of the Homestead 128
  • Chapter X - Impasse 142
  • Part Ii: Alone - 1860-1865 153
  • Chapter I - Testing Time 155
  • Chapter II - Lion-Heart 174
  • Chapter III - Fight for Tennessee 188
  • Chapter IV - Senatorial Whip 205
  • Chapter V - Military Governor 217
  • Chapter VI - Lincoln and Johnson 243
  • Chapter VII - Vice-President 263
  • Chapter VIII - The Execution of Mrs. Surratt 277
  • Chapter IX - Hero of an Hour 292
  • Chapter X - Thad Stevens Pockets Congress 307
  • Part Iii: Unbowed - 1865 and After 323
  • Chapter I - Presidential Reconstruction 325
  • Chapter II - Swinging Round the Circle 347
  • Chapter III - Veto Follows Veto 372
  • Chapter IV - The Great Reconstruction 390
  • Chapter V - Impeachment of the President 405
  • Chapter VI - The Trial 428
  • Chapter VII - Foreign and Domestic Policy 455
  • Chapter VIII - Leaving the White House 471
  • Chapter IX - The Come-Back 490
  • Chapter X - Sixty Years After 510
  • Appendix A 521
  • Appendix B 522
  • Appendix C 526
  • Bibliography 529
  • Index 541
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