Collis Potter Huntington - Vol. 1

By Cerinda W. Evans | Go to book overview

Chapter XXV
DISSENSION IN THE COMPANY

CONSTRUCTION of the railroad began early in the year 1863, and friction soon developed between the chief engineer and the other officials of the company. Judah considered himself the logical leader of the company by "rights." His early explorations in the mountains, his pamphlet and talks to attract attention to a possible route for a railway, arousing the interest of the Huntington group, the organization of the railroad company, the surveys that followed, and finally the Act of Congress, July 1, 1862, were, he felt, all results of his own activities. He considered, consequently, that it was his "little railroad," as he expressed it, and as such he was entitled to supervise and direct it and to control the expenditures.

There were men in the company, however, who would dominate and control any work of which they had a part, and they did not hesitate to assume the management of this railroad. As they provided the funds, they felt themselves obligated to control the use of it and to be responsible for the decisions made.

Judah's resentment was aroused against Huntington early in the proceedings by his refusal to accept Judah's plans for a railway office which Huntington thought was too costly. Then he had corrected an item in Judah's estimate of the surveys, and had changed the route of the railroad at a point on

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