Collis Potter Huntington - Vol. 1

By Cerinda W. Evans | Go to book overview

Chapter XXXVI
"ALL THE RAILROADS IN THE STATE"

IN APRIL 1868, Mr. Hopkins had written to Mr. Huntington commenting rather bitterly about certain attitudes of the people toward railroads, to which Mr. Huntington replied, April 14, 1868:

I notice that you write that everybody is in favor of a railroad until they get it built and then everyone is against it unless the railroad company will carry them and theirs for nothing. In all of which I think you are quite right, but I have about made up my mind that it is about as well to fight them on all the railroads in the state as on our road, as it is not much more fight and there is more pay . . . I wish you would send me the names of all the railroads in California, the length of them, and the names of the officers, stating starting point and terminus of each.

And the Central Pacific Railroad Company proceeded to do just that. They had already acquired several lines contingent to the main line. Shortly after the Central Pacific had reached Roseville in February, 1864, the company purchased the California Central or the Marysville & Lincoln Railroad extending from Folsom through Roseville to Marysville. The portion between Roseville and Folsom was abandoned, and the bridge over the Ameriacn River was condemned in 1868 and sold.1

-238-

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