Masterpieces of Latin Literature: Terence: Lucretius: Catullus: Virgil: Horace: Tibullus: Propertius: Ovid: Petronius: Martial: Juvenal: Cicero: Caesar: Livy: Tacitus: Pliny the Younger: Apuleius; with Biographical Sketches and Notes

By Gordon Jennings Laing | Go to book overview

THE MUTINY OF THE PANNONIAN LEGIONS1

(Annales, I., 16-30.)

SUCH was the situation of affairs at Rome when a fierce and violent mutiny broke out among the legions in Pannonia. For this insurrection there was no other motive than the licentious spirit which is apt to show itself in the beginning of a new reign, and the hope of private advantage in the distractions of a civil war. A summer camp had been formed for three legions2 under the command of Junius Blaesus. The death of Augustus and the accession of Tiberius being known to the army, the general granted a suspension of military duty as an interval of grief or joy. The soldiers grew wanton in idleness; dissensions spread amongst them; the vile and profligate had their circles of auditors; sloth and pleasure prevailed; and all were willing to exchange a life of toil and discipline for repose and luxury. There happened to be in a camp a busy incendiary, by name Percennius, formerly a leader of theatrical factions,3 and now a common soldier; a man fluent in words, and by his early habits versed in the arts of exciting tumults and sedition. Over the weak and ignorant, and such as felt their minds alarmed with doubts and fears about the future condition of the service, this meddlesome fellow began to exert his

____________________
1
Pannonia, which lay between the Danube and the Alps, had been organized as a province in the reign of Augustus. There were three Roman legions posted there. The mutiny took place just after Tiberius' accession, 14 A. D.
2
The strength of a legion was from 5000 to 6000 men. It was commanded by a legatus, under whom were the tribunes, six in number, and wider them the centurions.
3
A leader of claqueurs in the theatre.

-410-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Masterpieces of Latin Literature: Terence: Lucretius: Catullus: Virgil: Horace: Tibullus: Propertius: Ovid: Petronius: Martial: Juvenal: Cicero: Caesar: Livy: Tacitus: Pliny the Younger: Apuleius; with Biographical Sketches and Notes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Terence 1
  • Scene 2. 9
  • Scene 3. 13
  • Act III 18
  • Scene 6. 28
  • Act IV 34
  • Scene 4. 35
  • Scene 5. 41
  • Scene 6. 42
  • Act V 44
  • Scene 2. 46
  • Scene 3. 47
  • Scene 4. 49
  • Scene 6. 49
  • Lucretius 63
  • Invocation to Venus (i., 1-43.) 66
  • Atoms and Void (i., 503-550) 67
  • The Gospel According to Epicurus 71
  • The Fear of Death 76
  • Love's Extravagance 77
  • The Development of Man 78
  • Remorse 110
  • Love and Hate 124
  • At His Brother's Grave1 125
  • Cicero 127
  • To Caesar, in Gaul 162
  • To His Brother Quintus, in Gaul 164
  • To C. Trebatius Testa, in Gaul 165
  • To Atticus in Rome 166
  • Cicero and His Son to Terentia And Tullia, in Rome 167
  • To Atticus in Rome 169
  • Caesar 182
  • Virgil 198
  • Damon and Alphesiboeus 201
  • Signs of Bad Weather 210
  • After Caesar's Death 212
  • The Battle of the Bees 213
  • Horace 273
  • To Chloe 280
  • To Lydia 283
  • Simplicity 283
  • The Golden Mean 284
  • A Reconciliation 285
  • To the Spring of Bandusia 286
  • To Maecenas 287
  • Country Life 288
  • A Challenge 294
  • A Letter of Introduction 298
  • To His Book 299
  • Tibullus 302
  • A Rural Festival 303
  • Propertius 312
  • To Maecenas 313
  • A Change of View 314
  • A Roman Matron to Her Husband 318
  • Ovid 325
  • Livy 348
  • Horatius 353
  • Before the War 359
  • The Battle of Cannae (xxii., 44-49.) 362
  • The Carthaginians in Capua (xxiii., 17.) 373
  • Martial 393
  • Tacitus 399
  • Customs of the Germans 401
  • The Mutiny of the Pannonian Legions 410
  • The Great Fire at Rome 424
  • Juvenal 432
  • To Cornelius Tacitus 450
  • To Sosius Senecio 451
  • To Septicius Clarus 452
  • To Calpurnia 453
  • To Tacitus 454
  • To Sura 455
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 496

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.