ACKNOWLEDGMENTS AND INDEX

The author wishes to thank his editor-in-chief, Martha Hodge Amory, who has partnered every step, for seven long years, from idea to index. He wishes too to thank his publisher, Cass Canfield, for courtly candor and fiscal fortitude; his agent, Carol Brandt, for calm collection and cool confidence; his lawyer, Arnold Weissberger, for literate legality and eloquent arbitration; his manuscript editor, Beulah Hagen, for indomitable poise in deadline duress; and last but not least, his typist, Gwen Alden Williams, for virtuosity of both patience and skill. Warm personal thanks and high admiration for so many pictures are also due Slim Aarons and his wife Rita, as well as Ted Patrick, Harry Sions and the staff of Holiday magazine, and no less of same to that lion of the lens, Jerry Zerbe, and the staff of Town and Country. Then too the book could not have been completed without the cooperation and assistance of Hallowell Bowser and the staff of the Saturday Review, John G. Stewart and the staff of the New York Times Magazine, Hope Ridings Miller and the staff of The Diplomat, and Harriet Lundgaard and the staff of Celebrity Register. Besides these should be mentioned the late Dr. Arthur Adams and the staff of the New England Historic and Genealogical Society, Arthur Maynard and Frances Finley of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, Helen Ruskell and Sylvia Hilton of the New York Society Library, and Rufus Osgood of the library of the Harvard Club of New York; thanks too to Charles Scribner, Jr., and the staff of the Dictionary of American Biography. Apart from all these, signal service above and beyond the call of even remotely direct duty has been rendered by Marguerite Allen of Robert F. Warner Inc., Penelope Coker, James Copp, Emmett Dedmon, Athlyn Deshais, James A. Maxwell, Eleanor Arnett Nash, John L. Oliver, Eleanor Palmer, Stanton Peckham and Mrs. Margaret Ruhl.

The author also wishes to acknowledge his gratitude to the authors and

-553-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who Killed Society?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 599

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.