Escape from Violence: Conflict and the Refugee Crisis in the Developing World

By Aristide R. Zolberg; Astri Suhrke et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Patterns of Social Conflict and Refugee Movements

The Contemporary Crisis Reconsidered

From the moment of its eruption in the 1970s, the twentieth century's third refugee crisis quickly reached an unprecedented global scope, overwhelming the limited regime formed by the international community in response to the waves of refugees from the European upheavals of earlier decades. In the final chapter, we shall suggest guidelines for devising a more adequate regime, but it is evident that such an undertaking must be founded on an accurate diagnosis of the crisis itself. This can be achieved by disaggregating it into its component elements, using the empirical materials presented in the regional studies to determine what types of conflicts are most likely to generate refugees in the developing world, to specify the nature of the flows, and to assess their relative incidence.

Although the refugee crisis took the world by surprise, our regional accounts indicate that it was in the making for some time, beginning in the years immediately following World War II, when the reconstructed international community thought the evils that had spawned so many refugees in Europe in the first half of the century had been finally uprooted, and it might now proceed to resolve their sequels once and for all. The first of the non-European flows, which arose as a by-product of the formation of new states in the Indian subcontinent ( 1947), reenacted the "unmixing of nationalities" of the interwar Balkans. This process was repeated immediately afterwards in the Middle East, where the sorting out involved the sudden exodus of many Arabs from newly formed Israel ( 1948), as well as of Jews from Arab countries, a more protracted process reaching eventually as far afield as the Maghreb. As in the past, refugee problems of this sort rapidly solved themselves to the extent that the minorities had access to a homeland of their own. The fortunate ones now included the Jews, whose tragedy helped overcome their previous status as the collective "odd men out" in a world of national states. However, in a great stroke of historical irony, the solution to their predicament in turn contributed to the creation of a new stateless people, the Palestinians.

In their shadowy existence in the institutional framework devised by the international community to contain them, the Palestinians evolved into a refugee nation that, despite not having a formally constituted state, achieved a statelike capacity for pursuing its

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Escape from Violence: Conflict and the Refugee Crisis in the Developing World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 384

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.