William Dorsey's Philadelphia and Ours: On the Past and Future of the Black City in America

By Roger Lane | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Of Politics, Religion, and Popular Culture

While not precisely a Golden Age of Journalism, the period covered by William Dorsey's scrapbooks was one of fully free expression, and surely in technical terms the most innovative span in the history of the newspaper business. Full of cocksure conclusions, often scurrilous and fiercely partisan, the journals of the day were almost wholly unfettered by modern fears of libel law, or by modern restrictions in the name of sensitivity or taste. In other respects, however, the years between roughly 1873, when Dorsey began to clip out items in number, and 1903, when he largely stopped, represent the development of the newspaper (although not the publishing) business into a recognizably modern form.

The history of the Philadelphia Inquirer, locally the only surviving daily from the period, is fairly representative. Founded in 1869, it was published through the early 1870s under a rigid format, eight pages long, six days a week--no news on the Sabbath--with no single headline wider than any of its invariable six columns. It added a Sunday edition in 1889, graphics in 1885, wide headlines in 1893, photographs in 1899. By the mid-1890s the journal's layout, its editorial and sports pages, its special Sunday supplement full of special features and graphic department store advertising, had made it into something closely resembling its contemporary incarnation. The difference between then and now is less visual than economic: while the Inquirer today is the only daily in town--with the quasi-exception of the tabloid Daily News, published cooperatively by the same corporation--a century ago it had to share the market not with broadcast media but with six, eight, or ten other daily newspapers at any given time.

During the same period, although the Afro-American population of the city was according to somewhat suspect census figures no more than about 21,000 in 1870 and perhaps 70,000 in 1904, the black community managed to

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Dorsey's Philadelphia and Ours: On the Past and Future of the Black City in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 490

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.