William Dorsey's Philadelphia and Ours: On the Past and Future of the Black City in America

By Roger Lane | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
The Learned Occupations

For many of those who, in Reverend Mr. Tindley's phrase, were "running towards the light" of ideas and education, late 19th-century Philadelphia was a natural destination. The Quaker City was a lively intellectual as well as educational center, home not only to the Institute for Colored Youth and several white professional schools but to a number of outspoken black newspapers. All this helped to swell the number of those in learned occupations which, even excluding the teachers, already discussed, and the ministers, to be discussed later, grew proportionately much faster than the population. At the time of the Civil War there had been only a single trained doctor in the Afro- American community, no educated dentists, no nurses or lawyers, no secular journalists or lecturers; by the end of the century there were in most of these catagories more educated men and women than could comfortably make a living.

The limits were set by the community they served. Unlike the entrepreneurs who had enjoyed some white patronage before falling back on black Philadelphia, the professionals and semi-professionals had to rely on the black community from the first. That community needed their services, often badly, but it was not only poor and small but often unwilling to patronize fellow Afro- Americans in novel positions of authority. The very advantages of the city made it hard to make a living, since Philadelphia as an intellectual, educational, and religious center appealed to more professionals than it could support. Lawyers and journalists had to compete with each other as well as with established whites; so did doctors, who also faced additional problems posed by illegal or unlicensed practitioners. The result for those who stayed in the city itself was then a qualified success story; many lived and worked in ways that made it misleading to include them in the "professional" category in the census, for example. But for the race as a whole there were fewer qualifications: many

-166-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Dorsey's Philadelphia and Ours: On the Past and Future of the Black City in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 490

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.