Steel City: Entrepreneurship, Strategy, and Technology in Sheffield, 1743-1993

By Geoffrey Tweedale | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book had its genesis in the multi-volume History of Sheffield project, which was launched by the History Department at Sheffield University to commemorate the city's centenary in 1993--a date which virtually coincided with the 250th anniversary of the discovery of crucible steelmaking. My research and writing was funded entirely by the Leverhulme Trustees, who awarded a three-year fellowship in 1991 for me to explore business strategies in Steel City after 1918. Since they had earlier supported work on an unrelated subject elsewhere, my debt to the Leverhulme Trust is great. At Sheffield, Clyde Binfield especially, and also Colin Holmes and Ian Kershaw (as head of department) provided the support for this project. Others who took an interest in my work included David Martin, David Higgins, Kenneth Warren, and Peter Payne; and I also received help along the way from Robert Gordon and Robert Kanigel in America. I owe a particular debt to Philip Hansen, whose labours at the photocopier and amongst dusty old newspapers saved me much drudgery and many trips to Sheffield. Bernard Callan greatly assisted in the final 'crinking' by meticulously reading this manuscript: he also kept me in touch with the Sheffield scene and ensured that living on the other side of the Peaks was not too great a disadvantage.

Most of the research was undertaken at two locations: Sheffield City Library Archives, where Richard Childs (and his successor, Margaret Turner), Ruth Harman, and others, gave every assistance; and in the Central Library's peerless Local Studies Department, where Doug Hindmarch, Sylvia Pybus, Martin Olive, and several others have kindly fetched books and documents for me over the years.

In locating and gaining access to other records, I was assisted by Peter Carnell at Sheffield University Library; Julie MacDonald at the Cutlers' Company; Michael Moss at Glasgow University Archives; Elizabeth Ogborn at the Bank of England Archives; Jenny Robinson at the British Steel Regional Records Centre, Middlesbrough; John Taylor at the Cammell-Laird Archives, Birkenhead; Nigel Watts at John Brown PLC, London; and N. Brown at the Rural History Centre, University of Reading.

Within the steel industry I received considerable help from many former and present company chairmen, directors, and metallurgists, who provided recollections (usually by interview) and documents, and commented on my early drafts. They are listed in the sources.

David Musson, my editor at Oxford University Press, was helpful in various ways, especially in gently urging upon me a sharper framework for this book. Paul Tweedale provided computer help; and Mary Titchmarsh, as ever, kept me cheerful during its writing.

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Steel City: Entrepreneurship, Strategy, and Technology in Sheffield, 1743-1993
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.