Steel City: Entrepreneurship, Strategy, and Technology in Sheffield, 1743-1993

By Geoffrey Tweedale | Go to book overview

Epilogue: Steel City and United
Kingdom Industrial Decline

without steel there could be no Sheffield.

Sheffield Replanned ( Sheffield Town Planning Committee, 1945).

In about 1844, many years after Benjamin Huntsman's death, a visitor to Sheffield had stood and watched the crucible teemers at work, when the industry was getting into full swing. He later wrote that:

no description can give an adequate idea of the scene which is presented. The terrible yawning mouth over which the first man hovers, the glowing mass which he draws forth, the intense whiteness of the liquid steel as it flows into the mould, the profusion of delicate greenish sparks which shoot forth during the pouring-- all form a spectacle which, once seen, will not be soon forgotten.1

Visitors touring a major Sheffield steelworks in 1993--some 250 years after Huntsman's discovery of the crucible steel process--usually have much the same feelings, even though the whole scale of operations has changed. Modern melting shops, such as those for stainless steel production at Shepcote Lane, can be overpowering to the uninitiated both in size, heat, and noise. To feel the air and the walkways vibrate with the deafening crackle of a 130-tonne electric arc furnace is to feel something of the awe with which spectators viewed the doings of the crucible men. At places such as Shepcote Lane, one is struck by the immense size of operations, by the intense heat, by the feeling of danger as huge vessels of molten steel are swung from place to place and as giant red-hot slabs shoot along rollers or are squeezed back and forth between huge presses. One is struck too by the remarkable absence of human activity. In fact, the melters and other workers have become bit players, reduced to minor walk-on-parts against a giant industrial set: they can be glimpsed occasionally in the cab of an overhead crane, at computer consoles in the control room, or more adventurously performing obscure tasks around the furnaces themselves.

The sights at the melting shop at Shepcote Lane can give rise to some conflicting impressions of Steel City, since they take place in an area whose most marked characteristic appears to be one of catastrophic

____________________
1
"A Day at the Fitzalan Steel and File-Works, Sheffield", The Penny Magazine, 13 (30 Mar. 1844), 121-8.

-389-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Steel City: Entrepreneurship, Strategy, and Technology in Sheffield, 1743-1993
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.