Public Access: Literary Theory and American Cultural Politics

By Michael Bérubé | Go to book overview

ment may be, it remains the case that some kinds of disaffection are more compatible with progressive democratic politics than others. In this respect, 2001 stands as an odd, barely audible parable about the betrayal of American democracy in the era of the space program, in which Kubrick combines a palpable love of the beauty of space travel with an indelible sense of disaffection from the space race as it's managed by the national security state - and finally with the apparatus of the national security state itself. 2001 gives us a mission in which our national purposes are known only to a power elite unaccountable even to its own instruments and operators; so too did the space race give us a national purpose that, in Dale Carter's words, 'had not so much been determined by an active electorate as endorsed by a disabled audience' ( FF, p. 183). And yet in 1968 it was still possible to imagine the Apollo program as the finest product of a free society and a free market, leading Americans into the final frontier and leading the rest of the world to follow American rather than Soviet models of progress and development. As we approach 2001 ourselves, now that the US space program has been fully militarized, the Soviet Union has declined to offer us limitless conflict, and there no longer seems any natural relation between American 'freedom' and the conquest of space, we should be able to hear 2001's skeptical subtexts all the more clearly. And we should recall anew what so few seem to have learned from Iran-Contra, arms sales to Iraq, and the Pentagon's resistance to openly gay military personnel: the current national security state is the enemy, not the guarantor, of democracy, and even in wartime and coldwartime, silence and secrecy do not necessarily work in the service of the national interest.


Notes
1.
Alexander Walker, Stanley Kubrick Directs ( New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972), p. 244.
2.
Quoted in Jerome Agel, ed., The Making of Kubricks 2001 ( New York: New American Library, 1970), p. 7; hereafter cited as Making.
3.
See, e.g., Daniel Harris review of Madonna criticism, "Make My Rainy Day", Nation, vol. 254, no. 22 ( 8 June 1992), pp. 790-93. Although Harris focuses on psychoanalytic close readings of Madonna's lyrics (some of which admittedly do seem to break Tin Pan Alley butterflies on Lacanian wheels), Harris maintains that all of pop culture (Madonna is but the exemplum) is meaningless drivel unworthy of being examined by the tools one applies to high culture. If that's the case, then any interpretation of it can plausibly be said to be an 'overinterpretation.
4.
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality. Volume 1: An Introduction ( New York: Vintage, 1978), p. 27.
5.
For a fine discussion of silences in Passing, see Pamela Caughie, "Passing and Pedagogy", College English, vol. 54, no. 7 ( 1992), pp. 775-93, esp. pp. 777-8.
6.
Quoted in Dale Carter, The Final Frontier: The Rise and Fall of the American Rocket State ( London: Verso, 1988), p. 196; Carter is hereafter cited as FF.

-200-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Access: Literary Theory and American Cultural Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction American Political Culture and Cultural Politics 1
  • Part I - PC and the Humanities 41
  • 1 - Discipline and Theory 43
  • Notes 58
  • 2 - Winning Hearts and Minds 59
  • 3 - Exigencies of Value 87
  • Notes 112
  • Part II - Critical Theory in the Public Sphere 117
  • 4 - Just the Fax, Ma'Am: Or, Postmodernism's Journey to Decenter 119
  • Notes 133
  • 5 - Pop Goes the Academy: Cult Studs Fight the Power 137
  • Notes 159
  • 6 - Bite Size Theory: Popularizing Academic Criticism 161
  • Part III - At the Closing of the American Century 179
  • 7 - Paranoia in a Vacuum: 2001 and the National Security State 181
  • Notes 200
  • 8 - It's Renaissance Time: New Historicism, American Studies, and American Identity 203
  • Notes 222
  • 9 - Disuniting America Again 225
  • Epilogue 243
  • Notes 266
  • Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.