Sons and Lovers

By D. H. Lawrence; David Trotter | Go to book overview

NOTE ON THE TEXT

BETWEEN the late summer of 1910 and the spring Of 1912 Lawrence wrote two incomplete and one complete version of a novel he meant to call ' Paul Morel'. The first incomplete version, written during the second half of 1910, concentrates on the lives of Paul's parents and those of Miriam Leivers; the second, begun in March 1911 and abandoned after 271 pages in July of the same year, offers a melodramatic account of the marriage between an irredeemably brutal working-class man and an irredeemably pious middle-class woman. The third version, a revision of the second in the light of extensive comments by Jessie Chambers, was begun in November 1911 and completed in April 1912, shortly before Lawrence met Frieda Weekley. This version was sent to William Heinemann on 9 June 1912, and rejected by him at the beginning of July, on the grounds that it lacked unity and was too outspoken. Lawrence asked Edward Garnett to read the manuscript for Duckworth, who had published his second novel, The Trespasser. In the autumn Of 1912 he revised a text which was now called Sons and Lovers in the light of Garnett's comments, and returned it. Garnett, however, still found it too prolix, and offered to edit it himself. Lawrence agreed.

Garnett deleted some eighty passages, many of which were sections of dialogue, including quarrels between Walter and Gertrude Morel (Chapter I), and conversations between Paul and his mother about women's education (Chapter VII), and between Paul, Clara Dawes, and the Leivers family about equal pay for women (Chapter IX). He also removed several scenes from the life of William Morel (Chapter III). The largest cut was a four-page account of the weekly rendezvous between Paul and Miriam at the Bestwood library, which demonstrates their enjoyment of each other's company (Chapter VIII). Lawrence received the proofs incorporating these revisions in February 1913. But he was still not quite done with the revisers. This time

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Sons and Lovers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxx
  • Select Bibliography xxxiv
  • A Chronology of D.H. Lawrence xxxvi
  • Contents 3
  • Part I 5
  • Chapter II- The Birth of Paul, and Another Battle 34
  • Chapter III- The Casting off of Morel-The Taking on of William 55
  • Chapter IV- The Young Life of Paul 69
  • Chapter V- Paul Launches into Life 98
  • Chapter VI- Death in the Family 132
  • Part II 165
  • Chapter VII- Lad-And-Girl Love 165
  • Chapter VIII- Stripe in Love 207
  • Chapter IX- Defeat of Miriam 246
  • Chapter X- Clara 287
  • Chapter XI- The Test on Miriam 315
  • Chapter XII- Passion 341
  • Chapter XIII- Baxter Dawes 386
  • Chapter XIV- The Release 428
  • Chapter XV- Derelict 462
  • Appendix 475
  • Explanatory Notes 476
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