Sons and Lovers

By D. H. Lawrence; David Trotter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII BAXTER DAWES

SOON after Paul had been to the theatre with Clara, he was drinking in the Punch Bowl with some friends of his when Dawes came in. Clara's husband was growing stout; his eyelids were getting slack over his brown eyes; he was losing his healthy firmness of flesh. He was very evidently on the downward track. Having quarrelled with his sister, he had gone into cheap lodgings. His mistress had left him for a man who would marry her. He had been in prison one night for fighting when he was drunk, and there was a shady betting episode in which he was concerned.

Paul and he were confirmed enemies, and yet there was between them that peculiar feeling of intimacy, as if they were secretly near to each other, which sometimes exists between two people, although they never speak to one another. Paul often thought of Baxter Dawes, often wanted to get at him and be friends with him. He knew that Dawes often thought about him, and that the man was drawn to him by some bond or other. And yet the two never looked at each other save in hostility.

Since he was a superior employee at Jordan's, it was the thing for Paul to offer Dawes a drink.

'What'll you have?' he asked of him.

'Nowt wi' a bleeder like you!' replied the man.

Paul turned away with a slight disdainful movement of the shoulders, very irritating.

'The aristocracy,' he continued, 'is really a military institution. Take Germany, now. She's got thousands of aristocrats whose only means of existence is the army. They're deadly poor, and life's deadly slow. So they hope for a war. They look for war as a chance of getting on. Till there's a war they are idle good-for-nothings. When there's a war, they are leaders and commanders. 'There you are, then-- they want war!'

-386-

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Sons and Lovers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxx
  • Select Bibliography xxxiv
  • A Chronology of D.H. Lawrence xxxvi
  • Contents 3
  • Part I 5
  • Chapter II- The Birth of Paul, and Another Battle 34
  • Chapter III- The Casting off of Morel-The Taking on of William 55
  • Chapter IV- The Young Life of Paul 69
  • Chapter V- Paul Launches into Life 98
  • Chapter VI- Death in the Family 132
  • Part II 165
  • Chapter VII- Lad-And-Girl Love 165
  • Chapter VIII- Stripe in Love 207
  • Chapter IX- Defeat of Miriam 246
  • Chapter X- Clara 287
  • Chapter XI- The Test on Miriam 315
  • Chapter XII- Passion 341
  • Chapter XIII- Baxter Dawes 386
  • Chapter XIV- The Release 428
  • Chapter XV- Derelict 462
  • Appendix 475
  • Explanatory Notes 476
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