An Indiscretion in the Life of An Heiress: And Other Stories

By Thomas Hardy; Pamela Dalziel | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF THOMAS HARDY
1840 2 June: Thomas Hardy born, first child of Thomas and
Jemima (Hand) Hardy, five and a half months after their
marriage. His father was a builder in a small but slowly
developing way of business, thus setting the family apart
socially from the 'work-folk' whom they closely resembled
in financial circumstances.
1848 Entered the newly opened Stinsford National School.
1849 Sent to Dorchester British School kept by Isaac Last.
1853 Last established an independent 'commercial academy',
and Hardy became a pupil there. His education was
practical and effective, including Latin, some French,
theoretical and applied mathematics, and commercial
studies.
1856 11 July: articled to Dorchester architect John Hicks. Soon
after this he became friendly with Horace Moule, an
important influence on his life.
1860 Summer: Hardy's articles, having been extended for a
year, completed. Employed by Hicks as an assistant.
1862 17 April: Without a position, travelled to London, but
soon employed by Arthur Blomfield as a 'Gothic
draughtsman'. November: Elected to the Architectural
Association; began to find his feet in London.
1863 Won architectural prizes; began to consider some form of
writing as a means of support.
1863-7 Possibly became engaged to Eliza Nicholls.
1865 March: "How I Built Myself a House" published in
Chambers's Journal. Began to write poetry.
1866 Hardy's commitment to the Church and his religious
belief seem to have declined though he probably
experienced no dramatic loss of faith.
1867 Returned to Dorset. Began his never-published first
novel.
1868 Sent MS of The Poor Man and the Lady to four publishers,
where it was read by Morley and Meredith, amongst
others, but finally rejected.
1869 Worked in Weymouth for the Architect Crickmay; began
writing Desperate Remedies.
1870 In order to take 'a plan and particulars' of the church,
Hardy journeyed to St Juliot, near Boscastle in North

-xlvi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Indiscretion in the Life of An Heiress: And Other Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • GENERAL EDITOR'S PREFACE vii
  • Introduction xi
  • NOTE ON THE TEXTS xxxvii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxxx
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF THOMAS HARDY xlvi
  • How I Built Myself a House 3
  • Destiny and a Blue Cloak 11
  • The Thieves Who Couldn't Help Sneezing 36
  • An Indiscretion in the Life of an Heiress 43
  • Our Exploits at West Poley 114
  • Old Mrs Chundle 164
  • The Doctor's Legend 173
  • The Spectre of the Real 184
  • Blue Jimmy: the Horse Stealer 212
  • The Unconquerable 220
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.