Kuwait: Social Change in Historical Perspective

By Jacqueline S. Ismael | Go to book overview

1
The Origins and Structural Development of Kuwait

KUWAIT IS A TINY SHAIKHDOM situated on the western shore of the Arabian Gulf. Isolated on three sides by vast expanses of desert and on the fourth by the Arabian Gulf, Kuwait society in the pre-oil era was shaped by the counterpoint of the two dominant themes of its environment--the desert and the sea. The geography of the Middle East outlines broadly the interplay of social forces that shaped early Kuwait. The juxtaposition of and desert, sea coasts, and fertile river valleys delineates three distinct life styles: nomadic, maritime, and agricultural. While the influence of agriculture is indirect in Kuwait, the desert and the sea come together there to provide both the stage and plot of early Kuwaiti society. How each influenced its structure, and how each was modified by the other in a continuous interplay of essentially antagonistic patterns is the subject of this chapter.


THE BEDOUIN BASIS OF SOCIAL STRUCTURE

The influence of the desert on early Kuwait society relates intimately to the great bedouin tribes of the Arabian desert. To these tribes Kuwait traces the origins of its founding fathers, and from the tribes Kuwait inherited and modified the structural foundations of the society.

Communal in character, the pure nomadic life of the Arabian tribes as exhibited in the heart of the desert was organized around pastoral wanderings as the basic means of subsistence within the harsh desert environment. There existed within Arabia's and ecological zones two distinct patterns of socioeconomic activity -- sheep herding and camel herding. The articulation of the two patterns took the sociopolitical form

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kuwait: Social Change in Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.