Kate Chopin's the Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation

By Marilyn Hoder-Salmon | Go to book overview

camera passes across a section of the parlor and stops just behind Edna's head so that the upheld sketch is large in the frame. Then the camera moves even closer to eliminate all of the background. The whiteness of the sketch becomes the image, and this dissolves into a large sunny room.


Scene 4. Reverie: Summer. A Series: The letter, the night swimming.

The large sunny room is Mme Lebrun's dormer room. The interior reflects the sloping ceiling and angled attic shapes. Two windows overlook the lawn. In the distance is the sea. The room's sparse light oak furniture and white accessories give it an airy look. Family photographs abound. The one incongruous element is a clumsy-looking sewing machine set at a right angle to a front window. Immediately the loud racket of the machine is heard. Mme Lebrun sews with power supplied by the little black girl, who crouches underneath to move the pedals by hand.

EDNA: (Offscreen) Good morning.

Mme Lebrun does not stop, but she is delighted to see Edna.

MME LEBRUN: My dear Mrs. Pontellier, how charming you look--and so rosy. Have you been neglecting your veil?

During this last sentence Edna moves into the frame and takes a seat on the wide window bench.

EDNA: Have you heard from Robert?

MME LEBRUN: A letter arrived in yesterday's packet. (She stops the machine.) He reminds me to give you a certain book. (She looks under the machine.) Delice, go and fetch it. (As the child runs out) Look next to the lamp in Monsieur Robert's room.

EDNA: It must be the Goncourt. He was reading it to Adèle and me. (Pause) May I see the letter?

Mme Lebrun takes a letter from her large apron pocket and hands it to Edna.

-53-

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