Kate Chopin's the Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation

By Marilyn Hoder-Salmon | Go to book overview

ROBERT: It doesn't help. When you stop fanning, the hot air feels all the more uncomfortable.

Edna has been using the fan more vigorously as Robert speaks the preceding dialogue.

EDNA: How like a man to say that! It's ridiculous. (It is quiet for a long moment.)

ROBERT: Must we part in ill humor?

The image changes. Now Edna is alone in the room. She walks about with a distracted look. After a moment, Edna speaks in a voice-over:

EDNA: Can't you understand? I've grown used to seeing you--to our excursions--the old fort--

Now the dialogue continues onscreen as Edna pauses by the screen door.

EDNA: It is so very quiet tonight.


Scene 11. Past time: Summer. Raoul and Etienne, an episode.

The camera follows Raoul and Etienne from a far distance as they playfully run along the shore. Now it is seen that they run toward a spot on the sand where gulls have gathered. In the background the sounds of bathers are heard. Then, as the two boys come closer to the gulls, the sounds fade away until it is quiet. There is a quick close cut to the boys, frontal perspective, as they continue to run. The image shifts to the gulls as they take flight in a startled formation; it is a very close shot. One gull seems to batter the camera. The camera returns to the boys as they come to a sudden halt as the last gull whirs away. Etienne thrusts out his arm to hold Raoul back, the camera pulls away. Both boys look down with a revolted expression. A half-eaten carcass of a large fish lies on the sand. The image changes to a shot of the boys from the rear as they nonchalantly run back to join the others. Etienne has his arms extended in birdlike mimicry.

-77-

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