Kate Chopin's the Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation

By Marilyn Hoder-Salmon | Go to book overview

some blooms along the neat rows. Léonce interrupts, but Dr. Mandelet listens intently.

LÉONCE: (Offscreen) Ratignolle's. Yes, she seems quite well. But to tell you the truth, I'm at a loss. (Pause) She's acting strangely.

At this disclosure Dr. Mandelet runs his fingers lightly through his beard. Léonce continues to explain Edna's behavior.

LÉONCE: I hardly know where to begin. For one thing, she's let the house go to the dickens.

The camera draws closer to the window view, out of which can be seen a woman, MADAME MANDELET, at work in the garden. With cutting basket and shears, she very deliberately selects flowers for a bouquet. The camera focuses on her while the two men continue their conversation offscreen.

DR. MANDELET: Women are not all alike, my dear boy. We've got to consider--

LÉONCE: (He interrupts again.) Believe me, this goes much further. Her attitude has changed. And toward me. (Pause) You understand.

For a moment the two men are silent. Then Léonce speaks and his voice betrays his irritation.

LÉONCE: She goes strolling about in the streets. She's not herself. I tell you, I don't like it.

DR. MANDELET: Nothing hereditary, is there?

At these words, the camera angle changes to show both men. Dr. Mandelet toys with a pen. Léonce leans back in the chair with an agitated thrust.

LÉONCE: Certainly not. The family is of sound old Kentucky Presbyterian stock.

DR. MANDELET: Why then, send her for a visit. It will do her a world of good.

LÉONCE: That's just it. The youngest sister is getting married soon, and Edna refuses to go. She insists on staying away!

-79-

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