Kate Chopin's the Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation

By Marilyn Hoder-Salmon | Go to book overview

forward and puts his hand on the rein as the Colonel climbs aboard. Alcée looks up to Edna and speaks to her in a teasing manner:

ALCÉE: You are certainly at home here. I'd like to be here again when you are. Possibly I could pay off my debts for the entire season.

EDNA: (She smiles.) I am not always so lucky.

FIRST ACQUAINTANCE: We've missed you, Edna.

SECOND ACQUAINTANCE: Why not dine with us?

The Colonel takes the reins and replies for himself and Edna.

THE COLONEL: We accept with pleasure. But first you must promise to let me mix a cocktail of my own invention!


Scene 4. Present time: Spring. Boarding the train.

This next series of shots will almost have the look of a different film. The interior of the train station is ugly, with a dingy and stifling atmosphere. The camera slowly rotates. Overall there is both a smokiness and a glaring light, the most artificial yet. The people are in dark travel clothes. The next shot is from inside the ticket office. The camera shoots from in back of the clerk through the divider bars, and toward Edna, who bends slightly to arrange her ticket. Her face is impassive. We become aware of the station noises, which include an indistinct clamor in several languages, the competitive calls of the vendors, and the sounds of the trains themselves.

There is a dissolve to a closeup of a section of an engine. Smoke billows across the screen. The camera slides away to focus on Edna as she boards the third car. A conductor leans down to help her. He says something, to which she shakes her head "no" as he assists her up into the train. The image changes to Edna walking down a narrow corridor. There are very few passengers in the compartments. Slowly the train pulls out of the station. Edna peers through the window of an empty compartment; then she goes inside. The train moves faster. Through the windowed door across to the other side of the compartment we see the New Orleans levee in a whir of blurred images.

-84-

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