Joyce, Milton, and the Theory of Influence

By Patrick Colm Hogan | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Joyce Agonistes: Reading Milton in Contexts

Joyce, even more than many other writers, sought from a young age to crush his competitors. He stole and criticized, incorporated and ridiculed. And he often praised lavishly those who could never compete with him. Extending a common modernist practice, he had a particular tendency to parody important precursors, as a number of critics have indicated. Discussing Joyce and Ibsen, Tysdahl notes that "Joyce often parodies what he makes important use of. Parody, in Joyce, very rarely amounts to an abnegation of the thing parodied" (13). Ellmann points out that Ulysses is in some ways "a great joke on Homer," but, he adds, "jokes are not necessarily so simple, and these [uses of Homer] have a double aim." Joyce's parodies are both '"mock-heroic" and "the ennoblement of the mock-heroic" ( James Joyce360). Mary Reynolds, in her study of Joyce and Dante, points out that "Joyce's own transformations, like the comments on Dante he made to friends, often have elements of burlesque and frequently of irony, but they never imply a reductive view of [ The Divine Comedy] its purposes, or its author" (4). Joyce similarly burlesqued Aristotle, refashioning his most influential poetic concepts into implicit puns and in-jokes, while at the same time making serious use of less-known Aristotelian ideas (see Hogan "Influxes").

But there is more to Joyce's defensive response to both influence and competition than parody. Indeed, Ibsen, Homer, Dante, and Aristotle are among the rather small number of truly important writers whose influence Joyce acknowledged. And in the cases of Ibsen and Aristotle, we have

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Joyce, Milton, and the Theory of Influence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.