Joyce, Milton, and the Theory of Influence

By Patrick Colm Hogan | Go to book overview

Appendix Joyce's Milton: The Contents and Annotations of Volumes from Joyce's Trieste Library Now Contained in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center of the University of Texas at Austin

There are at least six volumes in this collection that contain works or parts of works by John Milton. The fullest volume is The Poetical Works of John Milton , which includes a life of the poet. It was published by Gall and Inglis of Edinburgh and is undated, but Gillespie conjectures a printing date between 1875 and 1880 for an edition first published between 1872 and 1874 (see Gillespie166-67). Second to this is the A. W. Verity edition of Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity, L'Allegro, II Penseroso, and Lycidas, published by the Cambridge University Press in 1911. In addition, there are four collections that contain work of Milton: (1) An Anthology of English Prose (1332 to 1740), edited by Annie Barnett and Lucy Dale, with a preface by Andrew Lang ( London: Longmans, Green, 1912); (2) Selections from the Best English Authors (Beowulf to the Present Time), ed. A. F. Murison ( London: W. and R. Chambers, 1907); (3) English Prose from Mandeville to Ruskin (The World's Classics, 45), chosen and arranged by W. Peacock ( London: Henry Frowde, Oxford University Press, 1912); (4) English Prose: Narrative, Descriptive, and Dramatic (The World's Classics, 204), compiled by H. A. Treble ( London: Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press, 1917).

The Barnett and Dale anthology runs from Maundeville to Pope and is virtually lacking in annotation--except for an obscure inscription at the outset of the volume. From Milton, the editors include four selections. The first, from the letter on education, is an invigorating disquisition on the benefits of sport. The selection begins: "This institution of breeding which I here delineate shall be equally good both for peace and war." (Unless

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