Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants

By Constantine P. Danopoulos; Kostas G. Messas | Go to book overview

Greece is the most economically developed country of the Balkans and can play a constructive role in the economic development of the region. A number of Greek businesses have already set up plants in Albania, Bulgaria and Romania, and trade relations with these countries have expanded considerably in the last five to six years.

Athens' dispute with FYROM has taken center stage in foreign policy considerations. The "Macedonian question" has struck a sensitive chord among the Greek public. Lacking clear electoral mandates or strong public support, Greek governments have calculated that the benefits of proposed agreements, such as the "Pinheiro package" do not outweigh the costs of no agreement. To reverse this calculus and achieve an honorable compromise, the governments of Greece and FYROM must cease monopolizing the name "Macedonia" and must generate effective win sets at home for ratification of the negotiated settlement. Even though Athens ended the economic embargo in September 1995 and the two countries established diplomatic relations, the thorny issue of the name has yet to be resolved.


Notes
1.
Theodore A. Couloumbis and Prodromos Yannas, "Greek Security in a Post- Cold War Setting," Nato's Sixteen Nations, 38:2 ( 1993); pp. 18-21.
2.
The terms "state of Skopje" and "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" refer to the same identity. In this chapter, the first term is used to designate the country's name for the period preceding its admission to the United Nations (up until April 1993) and the second term for the period thereafter.
3.
Put in a different way by Honorary Ambassador George Papoulias, "Greece should never be left alone facing an enemy in the Balkans without counting on two allies." in George Papoulias, "Pos Ftasame stin Diethni Apomonosi" (How We Became Internationally Isolated) Oikonomikos Tachydromos, November 3, 1994, p. 38.
4.
Of course we have to keep in mind that the West did not manage to develop a coherent and unified approach to the Balkan crisis in general and the Bosnian civil war in particular. On many occasions, the British and French, which had troops on the ground, distanced themselves from the US viewpoint.
5.
I Kathimerini, June 2, 1993.
6.
Y. Doudoumis, Balkanikes Exelixis (Balkan Developments), ( Athens: Dodoni Publications, 1994), p. 71.
7.
The Washington Times, November 24, 1993, p. 7; see also The Washington Times, 14 December 1993, p. 6.
8.
I Kathimerini, March 24, 1994.
9.
I Kathimerini, July 15, 1993.

-165-

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Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: Ethnonationalism, Security, and Conflict in the Balkans 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2: Of Shatter Belts and Powder Kegs: A Brief Survey of Yugoslav History 19
  • Notes 41
  • 3: Defeating "Greater Serbia," Building Greater Milosevic 47
  • Notes 70
  • 4: Franjo Tudjman's Croatia and the Balkans 75
  • Notes 89
  • 5: Bosnian Muslim Views of National Security 93
  • Notes 110
  • 6: Montenegro: Beyond the Myth 113
  • Notes 131
  • 7: The Balkan Crisis and the Republic of Macedonia 135
  • Notes 150
  • 8: Greece's Policies in the Post-Cold War Balkans 153
  • Conclusions 165
  • 9: Albanian Nationalism and Prospects for Greater Albania 169
  • Notes 190
  • 10: Bulgaria and the Balkans 195
  • Notes 208
  • 11: Turkey and the Balkans: Searching for Stability1 211
  • Conclusion 220
  • Notes 221
  • 12: Romania and the Balkan Imbroglio 225
  • Notes 237
  • 13: Troubles in the Balkans: The View from Hungary 241
  • Notes 255
  • 14: Moscow and the Yugoslav Secession Crisis 257
  • Notes 271
  • 15: US Policy in the Balkans: From Containment to Strategic Reengagement 275
  • Notes 292
  • 16: France, Germany, and the Yugoslavian Wars 297
  • Notes 309
  • 17: Failure in Former Yugoslavia: Hard Lessons for the European Union 311
  • Notes 324
  • 18: NATO and the Bosnian Quagmire: Reluctant Peacemaker 331
  • Notes 347
  • 19: The United Nations and the Conflict in Former Yugoslavia 351
  • Conclusion 367
  • Notes 368
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
  • Index 381
  • About the Book 390
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