Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants

By Constantine P. Danopoulos; Kostas G. Messas | Go to book overview
Save to active project

The nation state should preferably be coterminous with the people who inhabit it. However, without genuine democracy and prospects for a decent economic standard of living, along with a keener sense of differentiation between the regions of the Balkans, national unity everywhere remains but a meretricious program. The conclusion drawn from the Hungarian vantage point looks almost unequivocal: underlying political differences are not going to be "solved" by simply tilting the balance of forces. Rather they need to be corrected piecemeal over years -- as accommodations specific to each region within the Balkans are designed and applied.


Notes
1.
Ivo Banac, The National Question in Yugoslavia ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1984), pp. 38, 50, 70, 75.
2.
In a nutshell, conquest gets explained as union; language (apparently immutable) forms the soul of nations; a mystic obsession with the sacred soil (one and indivisible) occupies a place of honor; cultural diversity is looked upon as obstacle to the dominant ethnic group's drive for homogeneity; some variant of "we are alone" prevents realistic reappraisal of current and past policies. Finally, the adage that "occupation should determine claims to lands" still evidently guides strategic thinking.
3.
Michael Lind, "In Defense of Liberal Nationalism," Foreign Affairs, 73, 3 ( May/June 1994): 87-99.
4.
Gidon Gottlieb, "Nations Without States," Foreign Affairs, 73, 3 ( May/June 1994): 100-112.
5.
Hungary is currently involved in two sets of agreements; a series of "frame agreements" with the Council of Europe regarding minorities, and a NATO-stipulated "ground agreement" which was designed to settle -- by diplomatic means -- outstanding issues among Partnership for Peace members.
6.
The Council of Europe does not encourage dual citizenship since its 1963 Convention.
7.
Népszabadság, October, 12, 1994, p. 3. On February 1, 1994 Hungary's association treaty with the European Union entered into force that envisages the country's integration into the EU at around the year 2000.
8.
Nipszabadsdg, October 7, 1991.
9.
Joseph C. Kun, Hungarian Foreign Policy: The Experience of a New Democracy ( Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1993), pp. 107-8, 136 and 156.
10.
Népszabadság, October 28, 1991.
11.
Népszabadság, March 28, 1994.
12.
Népszabadság, January 20, 1995, p. 11.
13.
Népszabadság, March 9, 1994.
14.
Washington Post, Feb. 6 and 15, 1994.

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.