Aging and skilled performance: Advances in Theory and Applications

By Wendy A. Rogers; Arthur D. Fisk et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Aging and Dual-Task Performance

Arthur F. Kramer John L. Larish University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

One of the best exemplars of a mental activity in which large and robust age-related differences have been consistently obtained is dual-task processing. In dual-task or divided attention paradigms subjects are instructed to concurrently perform two tasks. In some varieties of this paradigm subjects are instructed to treat one task as primary and the other task as secondary. In other situations subjects are instructed to treat the tasks as equally important. Dual-task "costs" are assessed by comparing performance of each of the tasks when performed together to their respective single task control conditions. The dual-task decrements have been calculated as both absolute costs (e.g., dual-task performance minus single-task performance) and relative costs ([dual minus single] divided by single). In both cases, the decrement measures represent an attempt to employ the single task conditions as baselines against which to compare dual-task performance. In situations in which reaction time (RT) serves as the dependent measure, relative cost measures are more conservative estimates of age differences in dual-task performance given that older subjects tend to respond more slowly than younger subjects on single tasks ( Guttentag, 1989; Somberg & Salthouse, 1982; but see Ackerman, Schneider, & Wickens, 1984; Baron & Mattila, 1989). In general, the study of dual-task processing in the laboratory represents an attempt to understand the manner in which humans cope with processing demands inherent in many real-world situations such as driving an automobile, cooking dinner while carrying on a telephone conversation, typing a manuscript while composing a letter, walking down a flight of stairs

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aging and skilled performance: Advances in Theory and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.