Leaving the Cave: Evolutionary Naturalism in Social-Scientific Thought

By Pat Duffy Hutcheon | Go to book overview

Five
Harriet Martineau and the Quiet Revolution

I found myself, with the last link of my chain snapped -- a free rover in the broad breezy common of the universe... I felt the fresh air of nature, after imprisonment in the ghost-peopled cavern of superstition.

-- Harriet Martineau, Autobiography

T wo generations separated the productive years of Hume and Rousseau and the coming of age of Harriet Martineau. Those generations had witnessed the American War of Independence and the heady days of the French Revolution when, for a brief time, people believed that democracy and social justice for all were realizable in their lifetimes. But this was not to be -- at least not in the "old world." The bloody aftermath of the revolution and Napoleon's subsequent dictatorship and wars of aggression resulted in a period of social crisis throughout Europe. With Napoleon's downfall, nationalism began to emerge as a powerful new religion, with numerous regional and cultural groupings seeking political unification into nation-states. At the same time, the Industrial Revolution in Britain, and to a lesser degree on the continent, was rapidly destroying the old social patterns and creating a new impoverished urban class.

Meanwhile, at least five identifiable schools of moral philosophy had evolved out of the formulations of the pioneers of social-scientific thought. The sensationalism of Hobbes and Locke was most apparent in the ideas of the French materialists such as Claude Helvetius, Étienne de Condillac and Baron d'Holbach. They, too, viewed the human being as a thoroughly material organism operating in a Newtonian universe of mechanistic cause and effect. And they held that all mental faculties and moral strivings are rooted in the senses.

A somewhat related strand of thought had originated with Adam Smith, who was also greatly influenced by the Newtonian world view and by Hume's

-70-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Leaving the Cave: Evolutionary Naturalism in Social-Scientific Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 504

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.