Quebec 70: A Documentary Narrative

By John T. Saywell | Go to book overview

A Second Hostage -- Pierre Laporte

OCTOBER 10-14

AS Jérôme Choquette spoke four men leaped into a 1968 Chevrolet. Half an hour later Pierre Laporte, forty-nine-year-old minister of labour and of immigration in the Bourassa cabinet, was the captive of the FLQ'S Chenier cell. The story of the kidnapping was allegedly told by Paul Rose, one of the kidnappers, after his capture:

I, Paul Rose, born October 16, 1943, of 5630 Armstrong Street, St Hubert, do solemnly declare that I am also known by the names of Paul Blais and Paul Fournier. I rented the house at 5630 Armstrong Street in St Hubert in company with Lise Balcer about March 1970. I introduced Lise as my wife, Lise Blais, since I went under the name of Paul Blais at that time.

Lise Balcer lived with us there until July 1970. Francis Simard, Bernard Lortie, and Jacques Rose also lived there. During that period, we were visited by Jacques Cossette-Trudel and his wife; and also, in August or early September 1970, Jacques Lanctôt, his wife Suzanne Lanctôt, and their son, Boris, lived with us at 5630 Armstrong Street in St Hubert for a couple of weeks.

Jean-Luc Arène, Normand Turgeon, and Marc Carbonneau also came to the house. About the end of August or early September the group split up and it was then that the Liberation cell and the Chenier financial cell were formed.

The Liberation cell was comprised of Marc Carbonneau, Yves Langlois, Jacques and Louise Cossette-Trudel, and Jacques Lanctôt. This cell was to carry out two kidnappings simultaneously, involving James Cross and an American named James Le Cou.

As for the Chenier financial cell, it comprised Paul Rose, Jacques Rose, and Francis Simard; Bernard Lortie was considered as a stand-by. We were supposed to look after the financing of the movement, which consisted of two cells.

About September 23 or 24, 1970, Jacques Rose, Francis Simard and I left with my mother and my sister, Claire Rose, in the yellow 1969 Plymouth Valiant automobile belonging to my mother. We were planning to raise funds for the FLQ (Front de libération du Québec) movement.

While we were in Texas, in Dallas, we were trying to buy firearms, revolvers, and we even paid one individual $30 to make the purchase. We heard on the

-55-

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Quebec 70: A Documentary Narrative
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents 1
  • Preface 3
  • Separatism or Federalism 5
  • The Cross Abduction 28
  • A Second Hostage -- Pierre Laporte 55
  • It's War-Total War 76
  • This Cruel and Senseless Act 100
  • The Montreal Election 111
  • The Last Act 121
  • Questions and Consequences 136
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