The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery

By A. Conan Doyle | Go to book overview

IV
THE CASE OF LADY SANNOX

THE relations between Douglas Stone and the notorious Lady Sannox were very well known both among the fashionable circles of which she was a brilliant member, and the scientific bodies which numbered him among their most illustrious confrères. There was naturally, therefore, a very widespread interest when it was announced one morning that the lady had absolutely and for ever taken the veil, and that the world would see her no more. When, at the very tail of this rumour, there came the assurance that the celebrated operating surgeon, the man of steel nerves, had been found in the morning by his valet, seated on one side of his bed, smiling pleasantly upon the universe, with both legs jammed into one side of his breeches and his great brain about as valuable as a cap full of porridge, the matter was strong enough to give quite a little thrill of interest to folk who had never hoped that their jaded nerves were capable of such a sensation.

Douglas Stone in his prime was one of the most remarkable men in England. Indeed, he could hardly be said to have ever reached his prime, for he was but nine-and-thirty at the time of this little incident. Those who knew him best were aware that famous as he was as a surgeon, he might have succeeded with even greater rapidity in any of a dozen lines of life. He could have cut his way to fame as a soldier, struggled to it as an explorer, bullied for it in the courts, or built it out of stone and iron as an engineer.

-66-

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The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tales of Terror 7
  • I - The Horror of the Heights 9
  • II - The Leather Funnel 31
  • III - The New Catacomb 47
  • IV - The Case of Lady Sannox 66
  • V - The Terror of Blue John Gap 80
  • VI - The Brazilian Cat 103
  • Tales of Mystery 131
  • VII - The Lost Special 133
  • VIII - The Beetle-Hunter 157
  • IX - The Man with the Watches 179
  • X - The Japanned Box 202
  • XI - The Black Doctor 219
  • XII - The Jew's Breastplate 244
  • XIII - The Nightmare Room 270
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