The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery

By A. Conan Doyle | Go to book overview

V
THE TERROR OF BLUE JOHN GAP

THE following narrative was found among the papers of Dr. James Hardcastle, who died of phthisis on February 4, 1908, at 36, Upper Coventry Flats, South Kensington. Those who knew him best, while refusing to express an opinion upon this particular statement, are unanimous in asserting that he was a man of a sober and scientific turn of mind, absolutely devoid of imagination, and most unlikely to invent any abnormal series of events. The paper was contained in an envelope, which was docketed, "A Short Account of the Circumstances which occurred near Miss Allerton's Farm in North-West Derbyshire in the Spring of Last Year." The envelope was sealed, and on the other side was written in pencil--

"DEAR SEATON,

"It may interest, and perhaps pain you, to know that the incredulity with which you met my story has prevented me from ever opening my mouth upon the subject again. I leave this record after my death, and perhaps strangers may be found to have more confidence in me than my friend."

Inquiry has failed to elicit who this Seaton may have been. I may add that the visit of the deceased to Allerton's Farm, and the general nature of the alarm there, apart from his particular explanation, have been absolutely established. With this foreword I append his account exactly as he left it. It is in the

-80-

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The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tales of Terror 7
  • I - The Horror of the Heights 9
  • II - The Leather Funnel 31
  • III - The New Catacomb 47
  • IV - The Case of Lady Sannox 66
  • V - The Terror of Blue John Gap 80
  • VI - The Brazilian Cat 103
  • Tales of Mystery 131
  • VII - The Lost Special 133
  • VIII - The Beetle-Hunter 157
  • IX - The Man with the Watches 179
  • X - The Japanned Box 202
  • XI - The Black Doctor 219
  • XII - The Jew's Breastplate 244
  • XIII - The Nightmare Room 270
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